Skip to navigation Skip to content

Ettrick

Distrobuton of Ettrick Soil Association DERIVATION:

Ordovician and Silurian greywackes and shales.

TYPES OF PARENT MATERIALS MAPPED:

  • Glacial till
  • Glacial drift
  • Shallow drift onto rock
  • Morainic deposits
  • Cryogenic deposits

COLOUR:

Greyish brown in subsoil, sometimes reddish brown.

TEXTURE:

Sandy silt loam within topsoil but finer textures e.g. clay loam at depth. Drift deposits are slightly coarser in texture. Slightly stony.

DOMINANT LAND USE:

Permanent pasture, forestry and recreation.

LANDFORMS:

Highly variable, drumlins and undulating terrainwithin lowland areas, hill or valley sides, with gentle or moderate slopes and upland hill summits.

SOIL CHEMISTRY:

Moderate acidity (pH around 5 under semi-natural conditions and low to moderate percentage base saturation and phosphorus within the subsoil. Low available cobalt and copper in some soils.

SOIL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES:

Potential rooting depth up to 50cm unless restricted by presence of rock or induration. Weak to moderate structural development within subsoil.

SERIES NAME SOIL TYPE DRAINAGE PARENT MATERIAL
Alemoor Peaty gley (SW) Poor Till
Altimeg Brown forest soil with gleying Imperfect Drift
Auchrae Peaty podzol Imperfect below
iron pan
Drift
Dochroyle Peaty gley (SW) Poor and very poor Drift
Dod Peaty podzol Free below iron pan Drift
Dunscore Brown forest soil Free Morainic deposits
Ettrick Noncalcareous gley Poor Till
Ettriskel Skeletal soil Variable Very shallow drift and residual
Flemington Brown forest soil Free Drift with partially sorted upper layers
Hardlee Peaty gley (SW) Poor and very poor Clayey till
Kedslie Brown forest soil with gleying and Noncalcareous gley Imperfect Clayey till
Linhope Brown forest soil Free Drift and colluvium
Littleshalloch Noncalcareous gley Poor Drift
Merrick Subalpine podzol Free Cryogenic
Minchmoor Humus iron podzol Free Drift
Peden Noncalcareous gley (SW) Very poor Till

 

Learning & Resources


Printed from /learning/exploringscotland/soils/series/ettrick on 25/06/18 09:17:28 AM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.