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Peat Surveys: Summary (17 Selected Peat Deposits)

Summary of Peat Deposit Depths, and Land Cover in 1988

Distribution of peat depths for 17 selected peat deposits; Scottish Peat Committee; Macaulay Institute; James Hutton Institute
Land cover 1988 of 17 selected peat deposits; Scottish Peat Committee; Macaulay Institute; James Hutton Institute
1 Land Cover of Scotland (1988), by aerial interpretation
 
 
Number of Deposits Summarised Number of survey points Survey area of deposits summarised (km2)1 Number of points (depth >0.1 m) Maximum depth (m) Mean depth (of points >= 0.1m; m)
17 4,287 47.0 3,641 11.0 3.2


Notes:

Survey area (ha) (km2):

  • Area of extent of surveys (note: not the same as area > 0.5m deep as reported for individual peat deposits)

Max. depth (m):

  • Maximum measured depth, unless otherwise stated

Mean depth (m):

  • Mean depth of measured points >= 0.1m deep

Land Cover:

  • Land cover is from the Land Cover of Scotland (1988), aerial photographic interpretation, by the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute. It is not the land cover at the time of the survey, nor the present day.

Collated from survey data records, by: 

  • David Miller – formerly surveyor, Peat and Forest Soils, Macaulay Institute for Soil Research and  Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, currently Knowledge Exchange Coordinator, James Hutton Institute
  • Allan Robertson – formerly Head of Department, Peat and Forest Soils, Macaulay Institute for Soil Research
  • John Bell – soil surveyor, Soil Survey of Scotland, Macaulay Institute for Soil Research, and peat surveys, Macaulay Land Use Research Institute
  • James Anderson - formerly of the Peat Section, Peat and Forest Soils, Macaulay Institute for Soil Research
  • Jane Morrice - formerly of Peat and Forest Soils, Macaulay Institute for Soil Research, and Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, formerly research scientist, James Hutton Institute

Learning & Resources


Printed from /learning/natural-resource-datasets/peat-surveys/summary on 24/04/18 04:13:03 AM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.