Skip to navigation Skip to content

Sand dune communities and climate change

Photograph of coastal sand dunes
The response of the vegetation is modelled to assess if ecosystem processes and species distribution are related to climate.

Scotland’s sand dune vegetation has been assessed to investigate species distribution in relation to ecological variables. The response of the vegetation is modelled to assess if ecosystem processes and species distribution are related to climate. The study will test this relationship to determine if shifts in species distributions correspond to shifts in trait characteristics of the vegetation, allowing us to identify potential species at risk from loss of suitable habitat despite no loss of suitable climate.

During 2010, the Institute carried out a resurvey of the vegetation of major Machair sites around the west and north coast of Scotland. The previous survey was carried out in 1976 and 1977 and comparison will show how management changes may have contributed to changes in the biodiversity of this important habitat. The work is being funded by the Esmee Fairbairn Foundation and the Scottish Government.

Who is working in this area?

Rob Lewis

Robin Pakeman

Research

Subscribe to our monthly newsletter:

 


  • Email: info@hutton.ac.uk
  • Phone: +44 (0)844 928 5428
  • Craigiebuckler Aberdeen AB15 8QH Scotland
  • Invergowrie Dundee DD2 5DA Scotland
A Scottish charitable company limited by guarantee. Registered in Scotland No SC374831.
Registered office: The James Hutton Institute, Invergowrie Dundee DD2 5DA. Charity No SCO41796

Printed from /research/themes/managing-catchments-and-coasts/consultancy/global-change/sand-dune on 23/07/14 02:24:55 AM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.