Skip to navigation Skip to content

Call for small-scale poultry keepers to help develop bird flu advice

Subscribe to our blog postings by entering your email address:

Small-scale poultry keepers are being invited by The James Hutton Institute to workshops to discuss poultry care and bird flu.

The aim is to share ideas about ways to help keepers of small-scale flocks make informed poultry management decisions to better prevent outbreaks of diseases like bird flu in their flocks.

A number of events are being held, with one already run in Huntly. A second will be run in Glenrothes, in Fife, on Thursday, February 8, and a third in Lerwick, Shetland, on Thursday, February 22. .

The work follows unprecedented numbers of avian influenza outbreaks in the UK.

“’Backyard’ keepers are generally keen to keep their birds healthy and well,” says Hutton researcher Orla Shortall. “However, they can be difficult to reach, and may receive mixed messages from numerous sources about managing avian influenza.

“We’re interested in learning what could help them address these risks, and what other information would be useful to them to in caring for their flocks.”

Keepers interested in attending the event should register by contacting carol.kyle@hutton.ac.uk.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this blog post are the views of the author(s), and not an official position of the institute or funder.

Share

Comments

Post new comment

We moderate comments on our blog posts so there may be a short delay before your comment is posted: whilst we welcome a range of points of view and wish to foster debate, we reserve the right to delete those comments which are abusive, off-topic, or use foul language, or that appear to be spam.
The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Research


Printed from /blogs/call-small-scale-poultry-keepers-help-develop-bird-flu-advice on 20/04/24 09:02:48 PM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.