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Water Research at the James Hutton Institute (Research Page)

The topic of water research involves staff from multiple disciplines at the James Hutton Institute who collaborate on Water Related research.  Their work, either as part of our research programme for the Scottish Government o ... Read more

UnderStory - Storying woodland use, management and expansion in the Cairngorms (Project)

A digital story map will be created called the UnderStory and will provide an engaging, enduring account of perspectives on woodland use, management and expansion in the early 21st Century from the Cairngorms.It will be created ou ... Read more

Monitoring and Evaluation for Ecosystem Management (MEEM) - Comparing theory and practice across Europe (Project)

Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) is an essential part of the process of adaptive management, the process of learning from our actions in order to update and improve future ecosystem management.  Across Europe we have a n ... Read more

RD 1.2.4 Effectiveness of water management (Project)

This project contains several strands of research that focus on how can enable and implement improvements in water management.  It draws on a mixture of disciplinary skills and expertises, particularly the social sciences.&nb ... Read more

Balancing multiple goals in natural resource management (Project)

Our natural resources benefit society in many ways. Therefore, to achieve economic, social and environmental sustainability, management of natural resources must connect and consider multiple goals and issues.  However, many ... Read more

Behaviours in relation to rural diffuse pollution (Research Page)

Significant efforts and resources have been deployed to mitigate rural diffuse pollution through regulatory, guidance and voluntary measures. Despite these ongoing efforts, rural diffuse pollution remains a persisten problem. In S ... Read more

Exploring how to integrate goals for water management (Project)

There have been decades of calls for more integration in water and catchment management.  Many academic and policy documents state that improving integration should aid us in improving water management, particularly to effici ... Read more

MAGIC “Moving Towards Adaptive Governance in Complexity: Informing Nexus Security" (Project)

MAGIC takes a fresh look at the Europe’s goals for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth and the policies and instruments intended to support these goals. Many issues – including water, energy and food security - are ... Read more

References to GreenHealth research project (Project)

The GreenHealth project, and its findings, are referenced by the following research teams or outputs:   ... Read more

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
PhD Student
s.p.poskitt@pgr.reading.ac.uk

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Current research interests

Doctoral Research: Scenario planning, what is it good for? Investigating the benefits scenario planning may have for managing wicked problems.

Unsustainable relationships between humans and environments have led to significant problems that cross the boundaries between human and environmental systems. Such problems are characterised by multiple drivers that interact in complex ways and by uncertain pathways and conditions in the future. In the past two decades, scenario planning (the creation of multiple, plausible narratives that describe potential future conditions) has become an increasingly popular tool for helping manage such problems. However, it remains unclear exactly how and by what mechanisms scenario planning may help manage complex human and environmental problems. Sam’s PhD explores the use of participatory scenario planning as a tool for managing such complex and uncertain problems in human and environmental systems. Specifically, he explores learning in PSP, how learning occurs and what exactly is learned by whom in scenario planning processes.

Sam's PhD is supervised at the James Hutton Institute by Dr Kerry Waylen, and at the University of Reading by Dr Andrew Ainslie.

Past research

Sam's MRes research explored local people’s knowledge and perceptions of vulnerability to climate change in Sinazongwe, Zambia. He used a rudimentary scenario planning exercise as part of his methodology and developed a keen interest in it. However, the method was difficult for participants to understand and engage in, and failed to achieve the desired results. These difficulties subsequently attracted Sam to developing a more critical understanding of scenario planning through his PhD.

Sam also researched the emotional experience of driving for his undergraduate dissertation.

MAJI: More Action for Just Initiatives for Climate Change Adaptation in Southern Africa (Project)

The James Hutton Institute helps to support effective and equitable water management that will be sustainable in the long-term (and in the face of climate change), through its role in supporting a VSO-led project called “&qu ... Read more

Policy and Research Briefs (Research Page)

The briefs described on this page are either hosted on the knowledgescotland website, or are available for direct download (pdf format). ... Read more

Green Health Project Scientific Publications (Project)

Publications and Knowledge Exchange Project outputs include a number of papers in scientific journals, conferences, and events for stakeholders. Examples of such outputs follow: ... Read more

Green Health Project Research Team (Project)

James Hutton Institute ... Read more

Learning Landscape Partnerships (Project)

Despite many decades of research within protected area landscapes, many protected area management organisations struggle to use scientific expertise in their management and decision making processes. The project has been funded by ... Read more

Exploring barriers to natural flood management (Project)

This project aims to provide a better understanding of barriers to the adoption and implementation of natural flood management (NFM) in Scotland.  ... Read more

Realising Land's Potential stakeholder engagement events (Research Page)

Stakeholder engagement events relating to theme topics Health and wellbeing conferences and workshops Date Title Theme role Venue 25 November 2013 ... Read more

Sustainable Estates for the 21st Century (Project)

The overall aim of the project was to align upland estate management in Scotland with the concept of sustainability. Funding was provided by the Henry Angest Foundation and it ran from 2007-2011.     Project Object ... Read more

Understanding and reducing rural-urban conflicts: governing outdoor access (Project)

Project aims This project looks at the management of conflicts: ... Read more

OrkCEmP - Orkney Community Empowerment Project (Project)

Project aim Orkney Community Empowerment Project (OrkCEmP) is part of the RESAS Theme 8 (Work Package 8.2) work on 'Governance and Decision-making for community empowerment in rural communities', running from 2011-2 ... Read more

Ecosystem Approach Review (Project)

Project aim This project explored existing examples of the Ecosystem Approach, to identify implications for future equitable and holistic natural resource management.  ... Read more

The LandscapePartners Project (Project)

This research project aimed to identify, analyse and assess the contribution of multi-stakeholder partnerships to the sustainable management of rural landscapes and to the well-being of communities in three European countries. In ... Read more

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
PhD Student
kirsty.holstead@hutton.ac.uk or kh38@st-andrews.ac.uk

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Current research interests

My work expands a number of themes, many of which are interdisciplinary including:

  • Water and flood management including natural flood management
  • Transition to a low carbon society, including the role of grassroots initiatives
  • Natural resource governance
  • Community renewable energy production 
  • Land management and agriculture

In all these areas I use qualitative and mixed methods, with a particular interest in participatory methods. I am a trained and experienced facilitator. 

Past research projects:

  • EU FP7 FarmPath
  • Scottish Government RESAS Theme 1 Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity: Ecosystem Approach Review and WP1.2. Assessment of monetary and non-monetary values of ecosystem services and transferability.
  • In 2013/2014 I was a facilitator for the Ecosystem Approach Working Group (EAWG), as part of the Scottish Government’s research on ecosystem services. The main role of the EAWG is to facilitate research partnerships, knowledge exchange and collaboration between researchers, government agencies, NGOs and policy makers working in the area of natural resource management and ecosystem services.
  • Scottish Government RESAS Theme 3 - 3.6 Understanding land managers’ attitudes and behaviour towards the management of environmental assets and responding to climate change

Bibliography

  • Martin-Ortega, J.; Jorda-Capdevilla, D.; Glenk, K.; Holstead, K.L. (2015) What defines ecosystem services-based approaches?, In: Martin-Ortega, J., Ferrier, R.C., Gordon, I.J. & Khan, S. (eds.). Water Ecosystem Services: A Global Perspective. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, Chapter 2, pp3-13.

Community-based Management of Environmental challenges in Latin America (Research Page)

COMET-LA was a project coordinated by the University of Cordoba and funded under the European Commission Framework Programme 7. The acronym stands for “COmmunity-based Management of EnvironmenTal challenges in Latin America& ... Read more

Green Health (Project)

Contribution of green and open space in public health and wellbeing Partners Lead organisation: James Hutton Institute (Project Co-ordinator: David Miller) Research partners: ... Read more

VLT Publications (Page)

Publications in which the VLT is presented or discussed Wang, C., Miller, D., Brown, I. and Jiang, Y. 2016. Public Participation to Support Wind Energy Development: The Role of 3D GIS and Virtual Reality. In: Proceedings ... Read more

VLT Team Members (Page)

The Virtual Landscape Theatre is operated by a team at the Aberdeen offices of the James Hutton Institute. They have been responsible for designing, developing and implementing the theatre, 3D models, and programmes of surveys and ... Read more

Knowledge Exchange Coordinator
Information and Computational Sciences
Knowledge Exchange Coordinator
david.miller@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)1224 395276

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Current research interests

I am responsible for the strategic co-ordination of knowledge exchange at the institute, and research and commercial projects within the remits of several of the institute research themes. I am the Institute representative on the knowledge exchange and impact Gateway of SEFARI (the collective of six research institutes under the title: Scottish Environment, Food and Agriculture Research Institutes). In the Scottish Government Strategic Research Programme (2011-16) I was co-ordinator of the Land Use Theme.

My current research interests are on understanding the landscape preferences of different types of stakeholder with respect to characteristics of cultural landscapes, the implications for multi-functional land uses, and their incorporation into planning. This work takes account of the context of past and present land uses, and scenarios of future landscapes in the testing of public preferences with a view to understanding the significance of individual drivers of change on characteristics of landscapes. Research into visual quality in relation to scenarios of landscape change was undertaken under the Rural Economy and Land Use Programme (RELU), in collaboration with Dr Asa Ode, of Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. These studies make extensive use of spatial analysis of landscape characteristics and indicators, visualization tools, and both our stand alone and mobile virtual landscape theatre, with particular interest in enabling the development of visions of future land uses, rural and urban by stakeholders and the public, and the role of public participation in land use decision-making.

The development of these tools increasingly involves the combination of spatial modelling outputs with virtual reality, to provide augmented reality tools for both research and knowledge exchange. Research applications include in renewable energy, urban green spaces and human wellbeing, and rural and urban spatial land use planning. The direction of this research is to explore spatial and temporal pathways of change, and public perspectives on the evolution of land uses and landscapes into the future.

I lead areas of the Institute's knowledge exchange programme, including the Virtual Landscape Theatre, for communicating opinions about urban and rural pressures for land use change, between politicians, planners, and the public, including schools.

My research involves close working in teams comprising the social and natural sciences, which is also reflected in most of my research proposals, Scottish Government research activities, and papers. Examples of such studies are the recent study of the Effects of Greenspace on Human Health and Wellbeing (Scottish Government, Green Health), and Visualization Tools for Public Participation in the Management of Landscape Change (European Union, VisuLands).

Current research projects include

Recent competitive funding (projects overlapping 1 January 2007 - 31 December 2013) totals £6.157k, with £1.962k to the institute.

Collaborative networks

Previous European Union projects include

Reviewing responsibilities have included the European Union Framework Programmes, and research councils in Australia, Switzerland, Belgium and Norway as well as public agencies in the UK.

Past research

My research background has included the development of methods for handling and analysing geographic information, using them to map, monitor and model change in urban and rural land use and landscapes, mapping peat deposits in Scotland, the creation of natural resource databases (for example, land cover), and visual impacts of land use change.

Research on the visual impacts of land use change combine analysis of the landscape visibility, producing the first map of the intervisibility of the terrain of Scotland, land use change, and landscape preferences. Applications of the analysis of landscape intervisibility have included the assessment of landscape sensitivity to wind turbine development for Highland Council in Scotland, and the mapping of visibility for wind farm development in Scottish Borders. It also led to the first national level mapping and analysis of visibility of the seascapes of the coast of Wales as part of Maritime Ireland/Wales INTERREG 1994-1999, and of Scotland.

Wales Visibility of the sea from the land
Wales Visibility of the land from the sea

 

 

 

 

 

Research on viewing distances and visual impact of offshore wind turbines (with Ian Bishop, University of Melbourne) has been cited in a number of advisory reports, including in the UK and USA.

Our tools for the development of visual and cumulative impacts of wind turbines on landscapes have been applied extensively in the assessment of wind farm proposals. Examples include public enquiries into the extension of Cemmaes B, Llanbrynmair, Powys, and a conjoined public enquiry on the visual and cumulative visual impacts of wind turbines proposed at three sites in Mid-Wales, 2001, Carno, Powys, in each case presenting evidence on behalf of the Countryside Council for Wales.

Work on spatial decision support tools has included the use of GIS tools and rules based systems to produce the first spatial plans for the development of wind farms for Wales, the spatial plan for wind energy for Scottish Borders Council and inputs to the plan for Aberdeenshire.

Example of a spatial plan for wind energy in Wales (January 2002)
Spatial plan for wind energy for Scottish Borders Council

 

 

 

 

Digital mapping and analysis tools were developed to support the assessment of natural resources in Scotland. The principal applications have been as follows.

  • The topographic and peat depth surveys of 22 peat deposits in Scotland and England, listed here, (that is, surface and bottom contours, peat depth, isopachytes, cross-sections, peat volume, and peat quality), mainly raised bogs and peat workings. The survey methodology was broadly the same as that of the Moss Survey Group for the Scottish Peat Committee, latterly based at the Macaulay Institute for Soil Research (MISR). A listing of the topographic, depth and reconnaissance surveys of peat deposits in Scotland for the Scottish Peat Committee, and further surveys by MISR is available here. The deepest peat profile I surveyed was 10.0m (Creca Moss). The deepest in the Scottish Peat Survey records is 11.0m (Threepwood Moss, Roxburghshire). Maps of the areas surveys follow, with *.pdfs of the Scottish peat Survey sites to 1984 here, and peat depth surveys post 1984 here.
Sites of topographic surveys of peat deposits in Scotland
Scottish Peat Survey sites: Scottish Peat Committee and Macaulay Institute for Soil Research

 

 

 

 

 

Research on spatial planning and impacts of wind turbines, and resource assessments of peatlands are brought together in work on a payback calculator for wind turbines on peatland. This was for the Scottish Government, in collaboration with University of Aberdeen and Forest Research, from which a paper describing the calculator has also been published.

The studies of urban greenspaces Included inventories in Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Dundee; urban land use change; analysis of accessibility using route networks between every domestic property in the cities and the nearest of each type of greenspace. Projects have been undertaken for Scottish Enterprise on economic valuation (Streetscapes, with Robert Gordon University), the European Union on preferences, use, spatial modelling, and 3D visualisations (Greenspaceco-ordinated by University College Dublin; Greenclusterco-ordinated by Alterra), Edinburgh City Council on geographic analysis of access and greenspace audits, and Scottish Government on the contribution of greenspace to human health and wellbeing (GreenHealth, with Universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, and Heriot Watt, and BioSS). Watch the video description of the findings here. This is extended to the role of water, notably flooding, in relation to well-being such as a cause of stress, or a factor influencing psychological restoration (BlueHealth, for Scottish Government through CREW).

Recent reports for Scottish Government

Recent presentations

Recent events

  • 'Squeezed Middle' debate about land use in Scotland, at Gordonstoun School, 3rd October 2013.

Bibliography

  • Wang, C.; Hou, J.; Miller, D.R.; Brown, I.; Jiang, Y. (In press) Flood risk management in sponge cities: the role of integrated simulation and 3D visualization., International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction.
  • Alves, G.; Mattar, S.; Miller, D.R. (In press) United Kingdom: Renewable energy and landscape (National; Overview Chapter)., Renewable Energy and Landscape Quality; COST Action RELY TU 1401; Chapter 1.31, JOVIS, 90-93. Refereed Book Chapter.
  • Secco, L.; Pisani, E.; Da Re, R.; Rogelja, T.; Burlando, C.; Vicentini, K.; Pettenella, D.; Masiero, M.; Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M. (2019) Towards a method of evaluating social innovation in forest-dependent communities: First suggestions from a science-stakeholder collaboration., Forest Policy and Economics, 104, 9-22.
  • Sarkki, S.; Ficko, A.; Miller, D.R.; Barlagne, C.; Melnykovych, M.; Jokinen M.; Soloviy I.; Nijnik, M. (2019) Human values as catalysts and consequences of social innovations., Forest Policy and Economics, 104, 33-44.
  • Nijnik, M.; Secco, L.; Miller, D.R.; Melnykovych, M. (2019) Can social innovation make a difference to forest-dependent communities?, Forest Policy and Economics, 100, 207-213.
  • Kluvánková, T.; Brnkal'áková. S.; Spacek, M.; Slee, R.; Nijnik, M.; Valero, D.; Miller, D.R.; Bryce, R.; Kozová, M.; Polman, N.; Szabo, T.; Gezik, V. (2018) Understanding social innovation for the well-being of forest-dependent communities: a preliminary theoretical framework., Forest Policy and Economics, 97, 163-174.
  • Stanik, N.; Aalders, I.; Miller, D.R. (2018) Towards an indicator-based assessment of cultural heritage as a cultural ecosystem service - a case study of Scottish landscapes., Ecological Indicators, 95, 288-297.
  • Gimpel, A.; Stelzenmüller, V.; Töpsch, S.; Galparsoro, I.; Gubbins, M.; Miller, D.R.; Murillas, A.; Murray, A.G.; Pinarbasi, K.; Roca, G.; Watret, R. (2018) A GIS-based tool for an integrated assessment of spatial planning trade-offs with aquaculture., Science of the Total Environment, 627, 1644-1655.
  • Nijnik, M.; Nijnik, A.; Sarkki, S.; Munoz-Rojas, J.; Miller, D.R.; Kopiy, S. (2018) Is forest related decision-making in European treeline areas socially innovative? A Q methodology enquiry into the perspectives of international experts., Forest Policy and Economics, 92, 210-219.
  • Balazs, K.; Miller, D.R.; Schwarz, G. (2018) UNISECO Agroecological Knowledge Hub; Deliverable Report D8.2., Report and Website information from Understanding & Improving The Sustainability of Agroecological Farming Systems in the EU, to the European Commission, Thünen Institute, pp20.
  • Schwarz, G.; Sanders, J.; Miller, D.R. (2018) Project Management Plan D1.1; Understanding and improving the sustainability of agroecological farming systems in the EU., Project Deliverable, H2020 UNISECO, D1.1: Report to European Commission.
  • Miller, D.R.; Aalders, I.; Irvine, K.A.; Iragui, U.; Astrain, C.; Zabalza, S.; Schwarz, G. (2018) UNISECO Risk Register: D1.2., Contract Deliverable to European Commission for UNISECO project, Deliverable 1.2, Risk Register.
  • Miller, D.R. (2018) Transformations in European landscapes: towards 2030 targets., In: Roth, M., Eiter, S., Rohner, S., Kruse, A., Schmitz, S., Frantal, B., Centeri, C., Frolova, M., Buchecker, M., Stober, D., Karan, I., van der Horst, D. (eds.). Renewable Energy and Landscape Quality, COST Action RELY TU 1401; Chapter 5.1, pp214-225. JOVIS.
  • Miller, D.R.; Kruse, A.; Roth, M. (2018) Adaptive management strategies for renewable energy landscapes., In: Roth, M., Eiter, S., Rohner, S., Kruse, A., Schmitz, S., Frantal, B., Centeri, C., Frolova, M., Buchecker, M., Stober, D., Karan, I., van der Horst, D. (eds.). Renewable Energy and Landscape Quality, COST Action RELY TU 1401; Chapter 5.2, pp226-235. JOVIS.
  • Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R. (2017) Valuation of ecosystem services: paradox or Pandora’s box for decision-makers?, One Ecosystem Journal, 2, Article No. e14808.
  • Nijnik, A.; Nijnik, M.; Kopiy, S.; Zahvoyska, L.; Sarkki, S.; Kopiy, L.; Miller, D.R. (2017) Identifying and understanding attitudinal diversity on multi-functional changes in woodlands of the Ukrainian Carpathians., Climate Research, 73, 45-56.
  • Miller, D.R.; Donaldson-Selby, G.; Wang, C.; McKeen, M. (2017) Aquaculture spatial planning tool factsheet: seascape visibility analysis., Factsheets on Tool Selection and Guidance for Users and Practitioners; Project Report for Aquaspace, Milestone 20.
  • Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M. (2017) Data Management Plan: Scientific activities and outputs., Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas Project (SIMRA), Deliverable D1.3. Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp14.
  • Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M. (2017) Data Management Plan: Administration and management., Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas Project (SIMRA), Deliverable D8.2. Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp15.
  • Cook, G.; Miller, D.R.; Dawson, L.A. (2017) Report on the Consultation on Rural Economy and Connectivity Committee, Forestry and Land Management (Scotland) Bill., Response from SEFARI, August 2017.
  • Secco, K.; Pisani, E.; Burlando, C.; Da Re, R.; Gatto, P.; Pettenella, D.; Vassilopoulus, A.; Akinsete, E.; Koundouri, P.; Lopolito, A.; Prosperi, M.; Tuomasiukka, D.; Den Herde, M.; Lovric, M.; Polman, N.; Dijkshoorn, M.; Soma, K.; Ludvig, A.; Weiss, G.; Zivojinovic, I.; Sarkki, S.; Ravazzoli, E.; Dalla Torre, C.; Streifeneder, T.; Slee, W.; Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.; Barlagne C.; Prokofieva, I. (2017) Set of methods to assess SI implications at different levels: instructions for WPs 5 & 6., Deliverable 4.2, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp203.
  • Price, M.; Miller, D.R.; McKeen, M.; Slee, W.; Nijnik, M. (2017) Categorisation of marginalised rural areas (MRAs)., Deliverable 3.1, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp57.
  • Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M.; Barlagne, C. (2017) Minutes of 1st General Assembly., Deliverable 8.4, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp23.
  • Ludvig, A.; Weiss, G.; Zivojinovic, I.; Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R.; Barlagne, C.; Perlik, M.; Hermann, P.; Egger, T.; Torre C.D.; Streifeneder, T.; Ravazzoli, E.; Sfeir, P.; Lukesch, R.; Wagner, K.; Egartner, S.; Clotteau, M. (2017) Political framework conditions, policies and instruments for SIs in rural areas., Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas, Deliverable 6.1, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp36.
  • Kluvánková, T.; Gezik, V.; Spacek, M.; Brnkaláková, S.; Valero, D.; Bryce, R.; Slee, W.; Alkhaled, D.; Secco, L.; Burlando, C.; Kozova, M.; Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M.; Perlik, M.; Pisani, E.; Polman, N.; Price, M.; Sarkii, S.; Weiss, G. (2017) Transdisciplinary understanding of SI in MRAs., Deliverable 2.2, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, 58pp.
  • Gimpel, A.; Töpsch, S.; Stelzenmüller, V.; Gubbins, M.; Murray, A.G.; Watret, R.; Galparsoro, I.; Murillas, A.; Pinarbas, K.; Miller, D.R.; Brigolin, D.; Pastres, R.; Porporato, E.; Roca Carceller, G.; Marba, N. (2017) Deliverable 3.3 AquaSpace tool to support MSP, Ecosystem Approach to making Space for Aquaculture (Aquaspace)., Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp58.
  • Billing, S-L.; Gubbins, M.; Miller, D.R.; Watret, R.; Adams, T.; Black, K.; Donaldson-Selby, G.; Wang, C.; Greenhill, L.; Tett, P. (2017) Argyll and Bute, Scotland, UK., In: Strand, O. & Bergh, O. (eds.) Ecosystem Approach to making Space for Aquaculture (Aquaspace). Deliverable 4.2 Case Study Final Reports, Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute. Chapter 15, 251-272.
  • Barlagne, C.; Bryce, R.; Valero, D.; Price, M.; Mosdale, L.; Clotteau, M.; Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M. (2017) Ethical approvals for research with human participants in the SIMRA Project, Deliverable 9.5., Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp.29.
  • Secco, L.; Pisani, E.; Burlando, C.; Da Re, R.; Pettenella, D.; Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R.; Slee, B.; Gezik, V.; Kluvankova, T. (2017) D4.1 Guidelines to identify and analyse existing methods to assess social innovation and impacts., Report for Innovative, Sustainable and Inclusive Bioeconomy, SIMRA, 2017.
  • Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R. (2017) D8.2 Data management plan: administration and management., Report for Innovative, Sustainable and Inclusive Bioeconomy, SIMRA.
  • Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R.; Slee, B. (2017) D1.4 Criteria and indicators for monitoring and evaluation of scientific results., Report for Innovative, Sustainable and Inclusive Bioeconomy, SIMRA, pp17.
  • Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R. (2017) D1.3: Data management plan: Scientific activities and outputs., Report for Innovative, Sustainable and Inclusive Bioeconomy, SIMRA.
  • Barlagne, C.; Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M. (2017) Ethical clearance procedures in SIMRA., Deliverable 1.5, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), pp65.
  • Sang, N.; Gold, C.; Miller, D.R. (2016) The topological viewshed: embedding topological pointers into digital terrain models to improve GIS capability for visual landscape analysis., International Journal of Digital Earth, 9, 1185-1205.
  • Thompson, C.W.; Aspinall, P.; Roe, J.; Robertson, L.; Miller, D.R. (2016) Mitigating stress and supporting health in deprived urban communities: the importance of green space and the social environment., International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 13, Article No. 440.
  • Wang, C.; Miller, D.R.; Brown, I.; Jiang, Y.; Castellazzi, M. (2016) Visualisation techniques to support public interpretation of future climate change and land use choices: a case study from N-E Scotland., International Journal of Digital Earth, 9, 586-605.
  • Wang, C.; Miller, D.; Jian, Y.; Brown, I. (2016) Integration of GIS and virtual reality for future land-use: A case study from Royal Deeside., 24th GIS Research UK (GISRUK2016) Conference, University of Greenwich, London, 30 March - 1 April 2016.
  • Wang, C.; Miller, D.; Brown, I.; Jian, Y. (2016) Public participation to support wind energy development: The role of 3D GIS and virtual reality., Proceedings of 24th International Conference in Central Europe on Computer Graphics, Visualization and Computer Vision, 2016, Plzen, Czech Republic, 30 May - 3 June 2016. (Peer-reviewed).
  • Wang, C.; Jiang, Y.; Xie, H.; Miller, D.R.; Brown, I. (2016) Development of a flood warning simulation system: a case study of 2007 Tewkesbury flood., Floodrisk 2016, 3rd European Conference on Flood Risk Management, Lyon, France, 17-21 October 2016. E3S Web of Conferences, Volume 7, Article No. UNSP 18021.
  • Irvine, R.J.; Miller, D.R.; Artz, R.R.E.; Brooker, R.; Chapman, S.J.; Newey, S.; Hester, A.J.; Pakeman, R.J. (2016) Scoping a strategic vision for the uplands: A response from the James Hutton Institute., Response to a Consultation for Scottish Natural Heritage.

  • Miller, D.R. (2018) Transformations in European landscapes: towards 2030 targets., In: Roth, M., Eiter, S., Rohner, S., Kruse, A., Schmitz, S., Frantal, B., Centeri, C., Frolova, M., Buchecker, M., Stober, D., Karan, I., van der Horst, D. (eds.). Renewable Energy and Landscape Quality, COST Action RELY TU 1401; Chapter 5.1, pp214-225. JOVIS.
  • Miller, D.R.; Kruse, A.; Roth, M. (2018) Adaptive management strategies for renewable energy landscapes., In: Roth, M., Eiter, S., Rohner, S., Kruse, A., Schmitz, S., Frantal, B., Centeri, C., Frolova, M., Buchecker, M., Stober, D., Karan, I., van der Horst, D. (eds.). Renewable Energy and Landscape Quality, COST Action RELY TU 1401; Chapter 5.2, pp226-235. JOVIS.
  • Ode Sang, A.; Hagerhall, C.; Miller, D.R.; Donaldson-Selby, G. (2014) The use of visualised landscapes in order to challenge and develop theory in landscape preference research., In: Wissen Hayek, U., Fricker, P. & Buhmann, E. (eds.). Peer Reviewed Proceedings of Digital Landscape Architecture DLA 2014, ETH Zurich Switzerland 21-23 May 2014. Herbert Wichmann Verlag, VDE VERLAG GMBH, Berlin/Offenbach, pp362-369.
  • Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R. (2013) Chapter 25: Targeting sustainable provision of forest ecosystem services with special focus on carbon sequestration., In: Matyssek, R., Clarke, N., Cudlin, P., Mikkelsen, T.N., Tuovinen, J-P., Wieser, G. & Paoletti, E. (eds.). Climate Change, Air Pollution and Global Challenges: Understanding and Solutions from Forest Research. Elsevier. Chapter 25.9, pp547-568.
  • Wang, C.; Miller, D.R.; Jiang, Y.; Horne, P.; Morrice, J. (2012) Integration of Maya and ArcGIS: A new approach to representation in virtual., Design and Decision Support Systems, Eindhoven, August 2012.
  • Coleby, A.M.; Miller, D.R.; Aspinall, P.A. (2009) Public attitudes and community participation in windfarm development: strategic environmental assessment of renewable energy in Scotland., VDM Verlag, pp424. ISBN 3639158784
  • Ritz, K.; Dawson, L.A.; Miller, D.R. (eds.) (2009) Criminal and environmental soil forensics., Springer, 519pp. ISBN: 978-1-4020-9203-9
  • Barclay, A.D.; Dawson, L.A.; Donnelly, L.J.; Miller, D.R.; Ritz, K. (2009) Soils in forensic science: underground meets underworld., In: Ritz, K., Dawson, L.A. & Miller, D.R. (eds.). Criminal and Environmental Forensics. Springer, Dordrecht, Chapter 32, 501-514.ISBN: 978-1-4020-9203-9
  • Miller, D.R.; Vogt, N.; Nijnik, M.; Brondizio, E.; Fiorini, S. (2009) Integrating analytical and participatory techniques for planning the sustainable use of land resources and landscapes., In: Geertman, S.C.M. & Stillwell, J. (eds.). Planning Support Systems: New Methods and Best Practice. Advances in Spatial Science, Springer, New York, 317-345.
  • Miller, D.R.; Morrice, J.G.; Coleby, A.; Messager, P. (2007) Visualization techniques to support planning of renewable energy developments., In: Lovett, A. & Appleton, K. (eds.). GIS for Environmental Decision Making. Innovations in GIS Series, CRC Press, London, Part III, 227-239.
  • Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, A.; Morrice, J.G. (2007) Multi-functional landscapes in Scotland., In: Pedroli, B., van Doorn, A. & de Blust, G. (eds.). Europe's Living Landscapes: Essays Exploring our Identity in the Countryside. KNNV Publications, 105-123. ISBN: 9789050112581
  • Lange, E.; Miller, D.R.; Hehl-Lange, S.; Morrice, J.G.; Raoult, Y.; Wissen, U. (2005) Our Shared Landscape: Integrating ecological, socio-economic and aesthetic aspects in landscape planning and management., Conference Proceedings, Swiss Federal Institute of Technolgy, Zurich, 2-6 May 2005.
  • Miller, D.R.; Morrice, J.G.; Coleby, A. (2005) The provision of visualization tools for engaging public and professional audiences., In: Bishop, I. & Lange, E. (eds.). Visualization in Landscape and Environmental Planning. Taylor and Francis, Chapter 8, pp175-183.
  • Miller, D.R. (2001) Spatial modelling of the visibility of land use., In: Spatial information and the environment (P.J. Halls). Taylor and Francis Ltd, London, pp213-227.
  • Robertson, R.A.; Miller, D.R.; Morrice, J. (2001) Proceedings of 2nd International Seminar on The After-use of cut-over peatlands, Islay of Islay, October 2000., Northern Periphery Programme, Re-use and cut-over peatlands project. EU Secretariat.
  • Miller, D.R.; Morrice, J.G. (1996) An assessment of the uncertainty of delimited catchment boundaries., IAHS Publications, Ch.83, No.235, 445-451.
  • Miller, D.R.; Morrice, J.G.; Horne, P.L.; Aspinall, R.J. (1994) Use of gis for analysis of scenery in the Cairngorm Mountains of Scotland., In: Mountain Environments and Geographical Information Systems (eds. M.F. Price and D.I. Heywood). Taylor and Francis, pp.119-132.
  • Miller, D.R. (1993) Coupling of process-based vegetation models to GIS and knowledge-based systems with reference to vegetation change., In: Worboys, M. (ed.). Innovations in GIS,1. Taylor and Francis, Chapter 17, pp.241-250.
  • Miller, D.R.; Aspinall, R.J. (1992) Land Cover (Heather Moorland) in the Cairngorms by 10 km Squares.,
  • Miller, D.R.; Aspinall, R.J.; Moir, A.D. (1992) Land Cover of the Cairngorms, 1988: Heather Moorland., Map, scale 1:50 000, for the Cairngorms Working Party Woodlands Group.
  • Miller, D.R.; Aspinall, R.J. (1992) Land Cover (Woodland) in the Cairngorms by 10 km Squares.,
  • Miller, D.R.; Moir, A.D. (1992) Land Cover of Southern Grampian 1988: Forestry., Forestry Commission. Map.
  • Aspinall, R.J.; Miller, D.R. (1992) Distribution of red deer in the Cairngorms. Map., For Cairngorms Working Party Woodlands Group.
  • Miller, D.R.; Moir, A.D. (1992) Land Cover of the Cairngorms, 1988: Scattered Trees., Map, scale 1:50 000, for the Cairngorms Working Party Woodlands Group.
  • Miller, D.R.; Aspinall, R.J.; Moir, A.D. (1992) Land Cover of the Cairngorms, 1988: Principal Land Cover Features., Map, scale 1:50 000, for the Cairngorms Working Party Woodlands Group.

  • Balazs, K.; Miller, D.R.; Schwarz, G. (2018) UNISECO Agroecological Knowledge Hub; Deliverable Report D8.2., Report and Website information from Understanding & Improving The Sustainability of Agroecological Farming Systems in the EU, to the European Commission, Thünen Institute, pp20.
  • Schwarz, G.; Sanders, J.; Miller, D.R. (2018) Project Management Plan D1.1; Understanding and improving the sustainability of agroecological farming systems in the EU., Project Deliverable, H2020 UNISECO, D1.1: Report to European Commission.
  • Miller, D.R.; Aalders, I.; Irvine, K.A.; Iragui, U.; Astrain, C.; Zabalza, S.; Schwarz, G. (2018) UNISECO Risk Register: D1.2., Contract Deliverable to European Commission for UNISECO project, Deliverable 1.2, Risk Register.
  • Miller, D.R.; Donaldson-Selby, G.; Wang, C.; McKeen, M. (2017) Aquaculture spatial planning tool factsheet: seascape visibility analysis., Factsheets on Tool Selection and Guidance for Users and Practitioners; Project Report for Aquaspace, Milestone 20.
  • Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M. (2017) Data Management Plan: Scientific activities and outputs., Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas Project (SIMRA), Deliverable D1.3. Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp14.
  • Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M. (2017) Data Management Plan: Administration and management., Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas Project (SIMRA), Deliverable D8.2. Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp15.
  • Cook, G.; Miller, D.R.; Dawson, L.A. (2017) Report on the Consultation on Rural Economy and Connectivity Committee, Forestry and Land Management (Scotland) Bill., Response from SEFARI, August 2017.
  • Secco, K.; Pisani, E.; Burlando, C.; Da Re, R.; Gatto, P.; Pettenella, D.; Vassilopoulus, A.; Akinsete, E.; Koundouri, P.; Lopolito, A.; Prosperi, M.; Tuomasiukka, D.; Den Herde, M.; Lovric, M.; Polman, N.; Dijkshoorn, M.; Soma, K.; Ludvig, A.; Weiss, G.; Zivojinovic, I.; Sarkki, S.; Ravazzoli, E.; Dalla Torre, C.; Streifeneder, T.; Slee, W.; Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.; Barlagne C.; Prokofieva, I. (2017) Set of methods to assess SI implications at different levels: instructions for WPs 5 & 6., Deliverable 4.2, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp203.
  • Price, M.; Miller, D.R.; McKeen, M.; Slee, W.; Nijnik, M. (2017) Categorisation of marginalised rural areas (MRAs)., Deliverable 3.1, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp57.
  • Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M.; Barlagne, C. (2017) Minutes of 1st General Assembly., Deliverable 8.4, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp23.
  • Ludvig, A.; Weiss, G.; Zivojinovic, I.; Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R.; Barlagne, C.; Perlik, M.; Hermann, P.; Egger, T.; Torre C.D.; Streifeneder, T.; Ravazzoli, E.; Sfeir, P.; Lukesch, R.; Wagner, K.; Egartner, S.; Clotteau, M. (2017) Political framework conditions, policies and instruments for SIs in rural areas., Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas, Deliverable 6.1, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp36.
  • Kluvánková, T.; Gezik, V.; Spacek, M.; Brnkaláková, S.; Valero, D.; Bryce, R.; Slee, W.; Alkhaled, D.; Secco, L.; Burlando, C.; Kozova, M.; Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M.; Perlik, M.; Pisani, E.; Polman, N.; Price, M.; Sarkii, S.; Weiss, G. (2017) Transdisciplinary understanding of SI in MRAs., Deliverable 2.2, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, 58pp.
  • Gimpel, A.; Töpsch, S.; Stelzenmüller, V.; Gubbins, M.; Murray, A.G.; Watret, R.; Galparsoro, I.; Murillas, A.; Pinarbas, K.; Miller, D.R.; Brigolin, D.; Pastres, R.; Porporato, E.; Roca Carceller, G.; Marba, N. (2017) Deliverable 3.3 AquaSpace tool to support MSP, Ecosystem Approach to making Space for Aquaculture (Aquaspace)., Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp58.
  • Billing, S-L.; Gubbins, M.; Miller, D.R.; Watret, R.; Adams, T.; Black, K.; Donaldson-Selby, G.; Wang, C.; Greenhill, L.; Tett, P. (2017) Argyll and Bute, Scotland, UK., In: Strand, O. & Bergh, O. (eds.) Ecosystem Approach to making Space for Aquaculture (Aquaspace). Deliverable 4.2 Case Study Final Reports, Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute. Chapter 15, 251-272.
  • Barlagne, C.; Bryce, R.; Valero, D.; Price, M.; Mosdale, L.; Clotteau, M.; Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M. (2017) Ethical approvals for research with human participants in the SIMRA Project, Deliverable 9.5., Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp.29.
  • Secco, L.; Pisani, E.; Burlando, C.; Da Re, R.; Pettenella, D.; Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R.; Slee, B.; Gezik, V.; Kluvankova, T. (2017) D4.1 Guidelines to identify and analyse existing methods to assess social innovation and impacts., Report for Innovative, Sustainable and Inclusive Bioeconomy, SIMRA, 2017.
  • Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R. (2017) D8.2 Data management plan: administration and management., Report for Innovative, Sustainable and Inclusive Bioeconomy, SIMRA.
  • Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R.; Slee, B. (2017) D1.4 Criteria and indicators for monitoring and evaluation of scientific results., Report for Innovative, Sustainable and Inclusive Bioeconomy, SIMRA, pp17.
  • Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R. (2017) D1.3: Data management plan: Scientific activities and outputs., Report for Innovative, Sustainable and Inclusive Bioeconomy, SIMRA.
  • Barlagne, C.; Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M. (2017) Ethical clearance procedures in SIMRA., Deliverable 1.5, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), pp65.

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Qualitatitve Social Scientist
kirsty.blackstock@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Current research interests

My research focuses on governance, particularly public and stakeholder participation in environmental policy making and implementation. I have an associated interest in the use of 'tools' as deliberative boundary objects in decision making and evaluation processes. I generally favour mixed qualitative methods such as interviews, focus groups and participant observation. Threading through my research is an interest in reconciling critical approaches to policy making and implementation with constructive engagement in knowledge exchange with policy actors. This reflects my interest in ‘studying up’ – using the politics and practices of participatory research to work with people in positions of power and authority.  Currently, I am considering how systemic approaches co-exist with, conflict with or shape existing policies shaping Scottish land and water management, and moving into the study of reconciling living within planetary boundaries with social, environmental and geographical justice.

 

Ongoing projects

  • I am part of the Hutton team contributing to the H2020 project “Moving Towards Adaptive Governance in Complexity: Informing Nexus Security” (MAGIC - see also here) led by Mario Giampietro at Autonomous University of Barcelona (2016-2020).  My focus is to work on the 'semantic' phase of the quantitative story telling cycle - elicting and analysing narratives about the Common Agricultural Policy and its interaction with the Water-Energy-Food Nexus, Climate Change and Sustainable Develoment Goals; and discussing with EU stakeholders whether the outcomes of the social metabolism accounting are feasible, viable and/or desirable.
  • I coordinated the Scottish Government Strategic Research Programme WP1.4 on “Integrated and Sustainable Management of Natural Assets“ from April 2016 to April 2018. I contribute to several aspects of the research, including supporting our consideration of how adaptive management is practiced in Scotland (WP1.4.3) and participating in the Scottish Forum for Natural Capital's working group on Future Land Manager Business Models. My substantive contributions are focussed on how policy implementation can better support the delivery of multiple benefits and protect our natural assets. The focus is on the coordination or integration of policy instruments and the role of monitoring in developing a more systemic approach to management.
  • I work closely with two Macaulay Development Trust Fellows - Jessica Maxwell with reference to linking planning to ecosystem services; and Paola Ovando-Pol with reference to Natural Capital. I also supervise a Macaulay Development Trust funded PhD studentship on Natural Capital Accounting: Distribution of Benefits. Oliver Zwiner is co-supervised by myself and Julia Martin-Ortega (University of Leeds).
  • Past Projects

Bibliography

  • Sherlock, K.L. (2002) Community matters: Reflections from the field., Sociological Research Online, 7(2).
  • Sherlock, K.L. (2001) Revisiting the concept of hosts and guests., Tourist Studies, 1, 271- 295

  • Blackstock, K.L. (2017) Participation in the context of ecological economics., In: Spash, C.L. (ed.). Routledge Handbook of Ecological Economics: Nature and Society. Routledge, Abingdon, Oxon, Chapter 33, pp341-350.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Waylen, K.A. (2016) Delivering ecosystem services at a national scale: institutions and governance., In: Brooker, R., Hester, A. & Pakeman, R. (eds.). Ecosystem Services. The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, pp18-19.
  • Eastwood, A.; Irvine, J.; Blackstock, K.; Byg, A.; Fischer, A. (2016) Approaches for more integrated and participatory decision making., In: Brooker, R., Hester, A. & Pakeman, R. (eds.). Ecosystem Services. The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, pp14-15.
  • Waylen, K.A.; Blackstock, K.L. (2016) Concepts: 'Eco' terminology., In: Brooker, R., Hester, A. & Pakeman, R. (eds.). Ecosystem Services. The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, pp4-5.
  • Waylen, K.A.; Gearey, B.R.; Blackstock, K.L. (2016) Peatlands and cultural ecosystem services., In: Bonn, A., Allott, T., Evans, M., Joosten, H. & Stoneman, R. (eds.). Peatland Restoration for Ecosystem Services. Ecological Reviews Series, British Ecological Society, Cambridge University Press, Chapter 7, pp114-128.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Martin-Ortega, J.; Spray C.J. (2015) Implementation of the European Water Framework Directive: What does taking an ecosystem services-based approach add?, In: Martin-Ortega, J., Ferrier, R.C., Gordon, I.J. & Khan, S. (eds.). Water Ecosystem Services: A Global Perspective. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp57-64.
  • Church, A.; Burgess, J.; Ravenscroft, N.; Bird, W.; Blackstock, K.L.; Brady, E.; Crang, M.; Fish, R.; Gruffud, P.; Mourato, S.; Pretty, J.; Tolia-Kerry, D.; Turner, K.; Winter, M. (2011) Cultural services., In: UK National Ecosystem Assessment. Understanding Nature's Value to Society. Technical Report. Cambridge, UNEP-WCMC, Chapter 16, pp631-691.
  • van der Wal, R.; Bonn, A.; Monteith, D.; Reed, M.; Blackstock, K.L.; Hanley, N.; Thompson, D.; Evans, M.; Alonso, I.; Allott, T.; Armitage, H.; Beharry, N.; Glass, J.; Johnson, S.; McMorrow, J.; Ross, L.; Pakeman, R.J.; Perry, S.; Tinch, D. (2011) Mountains, moorlands and heaths., In: UK National Ecosystem Assessment. Understanding Nature's Value to Society. Technical Report. Cambridge, UNEP-WCMC, Chapter 5, pp106-159.
  • Ferrier, R.C.; Jenkins, A.; Blackstock, K.L. (2010) The future for catchment management., In: Ferrier, R.C. & Jenkins, A. (eds.). Handbook of Catchment Management. Blackwell Publications, Oxford, pp501-515.
  • Aslin, H.; Blackstock, K.L. (2010) Now I'm not an in expert in anything: challenges in undertaking transdisciplinary inquiries across the social and biophysical sciences., In: Brown, V.A., Harris, J.A. & Russell, J.Y. (eds.). Tackling Wicked Problems: Through the Transdisciplinary Imagination. Earthscan, London, Chapter 7a, pp117-129. ISBN 9781844079254
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Cooksley, S.L.; Langan, S.J.; Marshall, K.B.; Coull, M.C. (2009) CATCH: Integrated catchment planning: a handbook for project officers., Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, Aberdeen, 97p.
  • Blackstock K.L.; Richards C. (2008) Active involvement in river basin planning: lessons learnt from the River Spey, Scotland., In: Sustainability in River Basins: A Question of Governance (eds. A. Dehnhardt and U. Petschow). Oekom, Munich, pp269-292. ISBN: 978-3-865810342
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Brown, K.M.; Davies, B.B.; Shannon, P. (2006) Individualism, cooperation and conservation in Scottish farming communities., Rural Governance: International Perspectives (eds. L. Cheshire, V. Higgins and G. Lawrence). Routledge Studies in Human Geography, Routledge, UK. ISBN: 978-0-415-39959-3
  • Innes, A.; Sherlock, K.L. (2004) Rural communities., In: Dementia and Social Inclusion: Marginalised Groups and Marginalised Areas of Dementia Research, Care and Practice, (eds. A. Innes, C. Archibald and C. Murphy). Jessica Kingsley Publishers, London. ISBN: 1843101742

  • Waylen, K.A.; Marshall, K.; Blackstock, K.L. (2019) Reviewing current understanding on catchment partnerships., Project Report by the James Hutton Institute.
  • Matthews, K.B.; Blackstock, K.L.; Waylen, K.A.; Rivington, M.; Miller, D.G.; Wardell-Johnson, D.; Juarez Bourke, A. (2019) Progress in second reporting period for the work package "Quality check for EU policy narratives" (WP5)., In: Giampietro, M. Technical Report for the Second Reporting Period of the H2020 Project MAGIC, (Submitted to the EC).
  • Matthews K.B.; Blackstock K.L.; Waylen K.A.; Juarez-Bourke A.; Miller, D.G.; Wardell-Johnson, D.H.; Rivington, M. (2018) Report on the quality check of the robustness of the narrative behind the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP)., MAGIC (H2020-GA 689669) Project Deliverable 5.5, 29 November 2018, 65pp.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Juarez-Bourke, A.; Tindale, S.; Maxwell, J.; Waylen, K.A. (2018) O1.4.2biD3: Aligning existing and new delivery mechanisms for multiple environmental benefits., Research Briefing on ‘New’ Instruments, James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, 44pp.
  • Waylen, K.A.; Tindale, S.; Juárez Bourke, A.; Blackstock, K.L. (2018) Insights from international experiences of integration for water management., Final Report, James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, September 2018, 27pp.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Juarez-Bourke, A.; Maxwell, J.; Tindale, S.; Waylen, K.A. (2018) Aligning policy instruments for biodiversity, soil and water., Report, James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, 24pp.
  • Ring, I.; Sandström, C.; Acar, S.; Adeishvili, M.; Albert, C.; Allard, C.; Anker, Y.; Arlettaz, R.; Bela, G.; ten Brink, B.; Coscieme, L.; Fischer, A.; Fürst, C.; Galil, B.; Hynes, S.; Kasymov, U.; Marta-Pedroso, C.; Mendes, A.; Molau, U.; Olschewski, R.; Pergl, J.; Simoncini, R.; Blackstock, K.L. (2018) Communication, capacity building and public participation., In: Rounsevell, M., Fischer, M., Torre-Marin Rando, A. & Mader, A. (eds.). IPBES (2018): The IPBES Regional Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services for Europe and Central Asia. Secretariat of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, Bonn, Germany, Chapter 6, Section 6.6.3.3., pp1041-1043.
  • Ring, I.; Sandström, C.; Acar, S.; Adeishvili, M.; Albert, C.; Allard, C.; Anker, Y.; Arlettaz, R.; Bela, G.; ten Brink, B.; Coscieme, L.; Fischer, A.; Fürst, C.; Galil, B.; Hynes, S.; Kasymov, U.; Marta-Pedroso, C.; Mendes, A.; Molau, U.; Olschewski, R.; Pergl, J.; Simoncini, R.; Blackstock, K.L. (2018) Environmental governance for biodiversity and nature's contributions to people: synergies and trade-offs: Chapter 6, Section 6.4.2. Options for governance and decision making across scales and sectors ., In: Rounsevell, M., Fischer, M., Torre-Marin Rando, A. & Mader, A. (eds.). IPBES (2018): The IPBES Regional Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services for Europe and Central Asia. Secretariat of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, Bonn, Germany, Chapter 6, Section 6.4.2., pp980- 988.
  • Matthews, K.B.; Blackstock, K.L.; Waylen, K.A.; Rivington, M.; Miller, D.G.; Wardell-Johnson, D.; Juarez Bourke, A. (2017) Progress in first reporting period for the work package "Quality check for EU policy narratives" (WP5)., In: Giampietro, M. Technical Report for the First Reporting Period of the H2020 Project MAGIC, (Submitted to the EC).
  • Matthews, K.B.; Blackstock, K.L.; Miller, D.G.; Rivington, M.; Waylen, K.A.; Juarez Bourke, A.; Wardell-Johnson, D.; Giampietro, M.; Cadillo, J.; Kovacic, Z.; Volker, T. (2017) The basis of EU farm competitiveness and its wider consequences, Definition of policy case study for: Common Agriculture Policy (CAP)., In: Matthews, K.B. (ed). Definition Policy Case Studies MAGIC (H2020-GA 689669) Project Milestone, 10 November 2017.
  • Faccioli, M.; Blackstock, K.L. (2017) Review of UK natural capital initiatives., James Hutton Institute, 22pp.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Novo, P.; Waylen, K.A.; Maxwell, J.; Juarez-Bourke, A. (2017) Coordinating policy instruments that influence soil, water, and biodiversity in Scotland: rationales, needs and challenges., Report from an ESCom (Ecosystem Service Community) Workshop, Edinburgh, 23 May 2017. Published as a Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences Group (SEGS) Blog on the James Hutton Institute server, 16 November 2017.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Christie, M.; Elm, M.; Faccioli, M.; Herrett, S. (2017) Understanding and using the concept of natural capital in Scottish public sector organisations., Briefing for the Round Table on Natural Capital, Edinburgh, 23 November 2017.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Brooker, R.; Pakeman, R.J.; Ellis, C.; George, T.; Iason, G.; Gilbert, L.; Artz, R,.R.E.; Irvine, R.J.; McVittie, A.; Newey, S.; Mitchell, R.; Gimona, A.; Fischer, A.; Begg, G.; Maxwell, J. (2017) Ecosystems and Land Use Stakeholders Engagement Group (ELSEG) Workshop Report., Workshop, Victoria Quay, Edinburgh, 20 November 2017.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Van Hulst, F.; MacLeod, C.J.A.; Waylen, K.A. (2017) Monitoring and Evaluation for Ecosystem Management (MEEM) - Comparing theory and documented practice across Europe., Technical Report for Project, November 2017, 96pp.
  • Macleod, C.J.A.; Blackstock, K.L.; Brown, A.; Eastwood, A.; Fisher, A.; Gimona, A.; Prager, K.; Irvine, R.J. (2017) Adaptive management evaluation framework., RESAS1.4.3a Deliverable M2.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Dick, J. (2017) What has the concept of Natural Capital got to do with you?, ESCOM News, 29 January 2017. (Report on Workshop).
  • Blackstock, K.L.; McVittie, A.; Gimona, A.; Irvine, R.J. (2017) WP1.4 meeting report: progress to date and looking forward. RESAS1.4 additional deliverable in lieu of quarterly Work Package Management Group Meeting., Internal Workshop Report circulated to all MRP researchers involved in WP1.4.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Dick, J.; Rajagopalan, D. (2017) What has the concept of natural capital got to do with you?, Natural Capital Final ESCOM Report - Workshop Report, Grant Arms, Grantown-on-Spey, 8 December 2016. - will be linked to a blog on workshop to be publicised via ESCOM website.
  • MacLeod, C.J.; Blackstock, K.L.; Brown, K.M.; Eastwood, A.; Gimona, A.; Prager, K.; Irvine, R.J. (2016) Adaptive management: an overview of the concept and its practical application in the Scottish context., Technical Report for RESAS1.4.3a Deliverable D1, 24pp.

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social Researcher
kerry.waylen@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)1224 395313

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Current research interests

Kerry's main ongoing research projects

Her research is motivated by the following research questions:

  • When might it make sense to adopt new concepts and instruments for environmental management? How can we best understand the challenges and consequences of implementing such new concepts, especially those (such as the 'Ecosystem Approach') that encourage a systemic approach to connect multiple issues?
  • How are different knowledges produced and used in collaboration and decision-making for environmental management? If and how do concepts (such as ecosystem services) or tools (such as scenario-planning) influence processes of knowledge co-production, including in science-policy interfaces?
  • How can we better enable stakeholder participation in environmental management, including Community-Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) ?  What are the social and environmental consequences of doing so?

Kerry's current work predominantly uses qualitative research methods, e.g. collecting data from semi-structured interviews, workshops, participant observation, analysed using both inductive and deductive approaches.  She also has expertise in quantitative methods e.g. design, deployment and quantiative analysis of paper and online surveys for primary data collection, design and deplyment of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to analyse secondary data. To communicate and discuss research she uses varied methods, from short written briefings, longer reports and academic papers, through to videos, oral presentations and blog posts. She also has an established track record in project management, line management, student supervision, data management and research ethics.

Kerry currently co-supervises 1 PhD student: Kirsty Holstead, who is building understanding of community water governance, funded by a Hydronation scholarship, with Dr Shona Russell at the University of St Andrews. She previously co-supervised Sam Poskitt, who is exploring the potential of scenario-planning to support learning for sustainable development, joint funded by ESRC and the James Hutton Institute, with Dr Andrew Ainslie at the University of Reading. Sam obtained his PhD in March 2018 and now works at the University of Reading on the participatory extension work in developing countries.

Kerry is a trustee of the Orskov Foundation, a charitable foundation that supports students and communities to develop sustainable land use to support livelihoods in lower-income countries. She is also a research associate of CECHR, the Centre for Environmental Change and Human Resilience at Dundee.   Within the Institute, Kerry has led the 'Society Institutions and Governance' sub-group of SEGS, and she also founded the SEGS blog.

Past research

She jointly led research with Kirsty Blackstock to understand the potential and challanges of implementing the Ecosystem Approach, funded by the Scottish Government RESAS Strategic Research Programme 2011-2016. Click here to visit the webpage of the Ecosystem Approach Review. This and several other projects have explored multi-level constraints on adopting more systemic and/or participatory approaches to environmental management, including: exploration of the barriers to implementing natural flood management in Scotland; analysing the first round of River Basin Management Planning for implementation of the Water Framework Directive in Scotland; and appraising the factors that can act as barriers to improving water quality.

She has explored the potential of scenario-planning to support natural resource management: she first explored scenarios of future change environmental, social and policy change for FP7-project REFRESH, then for COMET-LA (an EU FP7 project on Community-based Management of Environmental Challenges in Latin America) she explored if and how scenario-planning can assist communities to identify and develop sustainable community-based management. From 2012-16 Kerry used this knowledge to support Malawian villages and district-level planning for integrated natural resource management in two projects called "Water Futures: Towards Equitable Resource Strategies" aimed to improve the resilience of Malawi'sn water management, whilst successor project 'MAJI' focused on how to take account of climate change.

Kerry also has expertise on knowledge co-production processes relating to environmental management: she co-led WP2 for the FP7 project ‘SPIRAL’ (Science Policy Interfaces for Research Action and Learning, for biodiversity). She has used this expertise to help support practical science-policy connections in later projects such as MAGIC. For example, she helped designed the ESPPI:CREW project to evaluate science-policy and practice links for the Scottish Centre of Expertise in Waters and was involved in CATCH II, an initiative which aimed to try to better connect policy, practitioners working in and for integrated catchment management.

Prior to working at the James Hutton Institute Kerry's PhD research, carried out at Imperial College London 2006-2009, examined how combinations of individual views, culture and local institutions could influence the outcomes of community-based conservation in developing countries. In addition to policy-relevant work with NGOs, her prior experience included social research into attitudes towards nature resources in Trinidad, as part of an MSc from Imperial College. Her first degree is a MA in Natural Sciences, from Cambridge University.

Bibliography

  • Young, J.; Waylen, K.A.; van den Hove, S.; Watt, A. (2016) SPIRAL Improving science-policy interfaces for biodiversity., In: Martinuzzi, A. & Sedlacko, M. (eds.). Knowledge Brokerage for Sustainable Development. Innovative Tools for Increasing Research Impact and Evidence-Based Policy-Making. Greenleaf Publishing, Saltaire, UK, pp275-290.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Waylen, K.A. (2016) Delivering ecosystem services at a national scale: institutions and governance., In: Brooker, R., Hester, A. & Pakeman, R. (eds.). Ecosystem Services. The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, pp18-19.
  • Waylen, K.A.; Blackstock, K.L. (2016) Concepts: 'Eco' terminology., In: Brooker, R., Hester, A. & Pakeman, R. (eds.). Ecosystem Services. The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, pp4-5.
  • Waylen, K.A.; Gearey, B.R.; Blackstock, K.L. (2016) Peatlands and cultural ecosystem services., In: Bonn, A., Allott, T., Evans, M., Joosten, H. & Stoneman, R. (eds.). Peatland Restoration for Ecosystem Services. Ecological Reviews Series, British Ecological Society, Cambridge University Press, Chapter 7, pp114-128.


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The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.