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oats

July 7, 2020
The 2020 edition of Arable Scotland – Scotland’s newest field event focussing on arable crops - took place online on 2nd July and was very well received: hundreds of e-delegates visited the event’s Virtual Field Map on the day,...
June 6, 2020
Arable Scotland 2020, Scotland's newest field event focussing on arable crops, is taking place online on 2nd July 10:00 am and will major on alternative crops and new markets. Registration for the free event is open at www.arablescotland.org....
June 6, 2020
The programme for Arable Scotland 2020, Scotland's newest field event focussing on arable crops, has been announced. This year's event is taking place online and will major on alternative crops and new markets.
February 2, 2020
By Professor Fiona Burnett, Co-chair, Arable Scotland
August 8, 2019
Arable Scotland 2 July 2020 Online
July 7, 2019
Scientists of the James Hutton Institute have discussed the latest research on arable crops as part of the launch of new event Arable Scotland, including renewed breeding efforts aimed at developing quality crops for defined markets, innovative...
June 6, 2019
Do you have any burning questions about key issues influencing Scotland’s arable industry? Come to Arable Scotland (Balruddery Farm near Dundee, 2 July 2019), the newly launched event focussing on the innovations that will drive the markets...
June 6, 2019
Oats are an important crop in the UK – even more so due to their increasing popularity as a healthy breakfast choice. Yet unlike other staple cereal crops, such as wheat and barley, R&D investment to improve oat agronomy has been...
December 12, 2018
Arable Scotland 2 July 2019 Balruddery Farm, Dundee
October 10, 2015
The science of the James Hutton Institute continues to attract the interest of the media. This time, Dr Julie Graham and Professor Derek Stewart were featured in the latest season of BBC programme Harvest, in which they discussed research on...

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The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.