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Collecting beetles: a practical guide

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Seminar
5 November 2013, 4pm: Free
at the James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen AB15 8QH
for scientists, students and other interested parties
Ground beetle © Anders Sandberg, Wikimedia Commons

Gabor Pozsgai of the James Hutton Institute, will give this Aberdeen Entomological Club talk at the Aberdeen site of the James Hutton Institute.

Collecting insects has not only been a hobby for many Victorian naturalists but is also the most effective tool in studying this highly diverse group of animals. In this presentation the most (and the least) commonly used collecting methods will be introduced along with the some mounting techniques. Alternative recording methods, developed in recent years will also be presented.

Gabor has 20 years experience in identifying various beetle taxa but mostly focused on Carabidae, Chrysomelidae and Curculionidae. He is involved in the UK Environmental Change Network project monitoring long-term changes in ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages at two sites in Scotland.

The talks begin at 4pm with light refreshments available from 3.30pm. For further information contact Jenni Stockan.

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The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.