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Vibrant Rural Communities workshop

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A workshop was held at Birnam Arts and Conference Centre on 20 November 2013 to provide an update on research being conducted as part of the Vibrant Rural Communities theme of the Food, Land and People Strategic Research programme, funded by Scottish Government (Theme 8 led by Professor Deborah Roberts, James Hutton Institute).

Workshop summary

Research projects in four main areas were outlined in poster sessions followed by group discussions.

Economic and social performance

Governance and decision making

Greenspace and wellbeing

Community empowerment and resilience

During the afternoon session participants were asked to identify the most important priorities for future research concerning rural communities that emerged from group discussion and feedback. This helped identify 10 priorities divided into ‘themes’perceived by workshop attendees to be most important for future research into vibrant and rural communities.

  • Community capacity
  • Wellbeing
  • Rural population
  • Natural capital
  • Housing
  • Community empowerment
  • Ecosystem services
  • Public sector
  • Research impact
  • Economic resilience

Report

The full workshop report can be read below.

Research

Areas of Interest


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The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.