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Ainoa Pravia

Staff picture: Ainoa Pravia
Ecological Sciences
Ecological Sciences
PhD Student
ainoa.pravia@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

I have a BSc in Biology (Botany & Zoology) from the University of Oviedo (Asturias, Spain), and an MSc in Wildlife Biology & Conservation from Edinburgh Napier University.

I have worked in conservation projects in different countries since I finished my MSc, i.e. I worked in Nevada (USA) in path building and restoration, mapping of alien plant species and the study of northern flying squirrel populations in Lake Tahoe National Park; or Germany in the reintroduction of European mink. In Scotland, I initially volunteered and later on worked for the Scottish Wildlife Trust with their protected ospreys at Loch of the Lowes, and as a seasonal ranger at their Spey Bay Reserve.

Current research interests

The project has been provisionally given the title “Evaluating peatland restoration for multiple outcomes”. Peatland restoration is currently being undertaken in the UK because of their great carbon storage potential and subsequent role in climate change mitigation. Biodiversity varies according to the type of peatland, but in the case of blanket bogs, species diversity is low but there are highly specialised species being supported by this type of habitat. 

It is most likely that there will be trade-offs between restoring peatlands for biodiversity or for carbon sequestration, the latter being the main driver for restoration at the moment. Trying to identify such trade-offs, I am currently looking at biological traits of different invertebrate taxa in pristine blanket bogs, restoration sites and afforested sites in the Flow Country.


Printed from /staff/ainoa-pravia on 13/12/18 03:18:00 PM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.