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Foundland

Distribution of Foudland Soil Assocation DERIVATION:

Slates, phyllites and other weakly metamorphosed argillaceous rocks, including andalusite-schists, fine-grained mica schists and block schists of the Dalradian series.

TYPES OF PARENT MATERIALS MAPPED:

  • Morainic deposits
  • Glacial drift
  • Cryogenic

COLOUR:

Yellowish brown to olive brown subsoil.

TEXTURE:

Fine sandy loam to loamy fine sand with a characteristic smooth feel due to high amounts of silt; slightly to moderately stony.

DOMINANT LAND USE:

Arable, forestry, recreation, rough grazing.

LANDFORMS:

Undulating lowlands, valley sides, rounded hills, hummocky valley moraines and mountains, slopes highly variable from gentle to steep.

SOIL CHEMISTRY:

Inherently acid with subsoil pH around 5.0. Base saturation is generally low to moderate (<50%)

SOIL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES:

Potential rooting depth usually between 30 to 45cm depending upon depth to induration and bedrock.
Weak subsoil structure.

SERIES NAME SOIL TYPE DRAINAGE PARENT MATERIAL
Carnhalton Brown forest soil with gleying Imperfect Drift
Cireineach Peaty subalpine podzol Free Drift
Drumardoch Peaty gley (SW) Poor and very poor Drift and till
Ettenbreck Brown forest soil Free Drift
Fisherford Noncalcareous gley (SW) Poor Drift and till
Foudland Humus iron podzol Free Drift and till
Foudlaskel Skeletal soil Variable Very shallow drift and residual
Ladylea Subalpine podzol Free Drift
Leitire Peaty podzol Imperfect Drift
Mairlenden Humus iron podzol Imperfect Drift and till
Meallrawur Podzolic ranker Imperfect Shallow drift
Rhinstock Brown forest soil Free Drift
Ruhumman Peaty ranker Poor Shallow drift and organic
Shanquhar Peaty gley Poor and very poor Drift and till
Suie Peaty podzol Free below iron pan Drift and till
Tornahaish Iron podzol Free Very stony drift
Veann Alpine podzol Free Cryogenic

 

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The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.