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Tarves

Distrobutionof Tarves Soil Assocation DERIVATION:

Mixed acid and basic metamorphic and igneous rocks, locally from intermediate metamorphic and igneous rocks e.g.hornblende-schist, biotite-gneiss and diorite.

TYPES OF PARENT MATERIALS MAPPED:

  • Glacial till
  • Glacial drift
  • Shallow drift on rock in situ
  • Deeply weathered rock
  • Morainic material
  • Cryogenic deposits

COLOUR:

Dark yellowish brown to yellowish brown.

TEXTURE:

Highly variable, the till has a sandy loam to sandy clay loam texture on free-draining sites but sandy silt loam to clay loam in sites with poor drainage. Drift deposits on the upper hill slopes and summitsis stonier and coarser in texture. Moraine deposits are generally a stony, gravelly loamy sand. Moderately stony within subsoil.

DOMINANT LAND USE:

Arable, forestry, recreation and rough grazing.

LANDFORMS:

Highly variable, from lower, convex and straight valley sides to steep upper hill slopes and hill summits ranging up to high mountain summits. Limited hummocky terrain on the valley floors and lower slopes.

SOIL CHEMISTRY:

Subsoil base saturation is variable, up to 80%;pH is between 5 and 6; total phosphorus low to medium (60 - 300mgp2O5/100g).

SOIL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES:

Potential rooting depth seldom exceeds 45cm dueto induration and/or rock. Weak subsoil structure.

SERIES NAME SOIL TYPE DRAINAGE PARENT MATERIAL
Burntrible Peaty gley Poor Drift and till
Ernan Alpine podzol Free Drift
Fenzie Humus iron podzol Imperfect Drift
Fiactach Subalpine podzol Free Drift
Pettymuck Peaty gley (SW) Poor and very poor Drift and till
Pitmedden Noncalcareous gley (SW) Poor Drift and till
Pressendye Peaty podzol Free below iron pan Drift and till
Tarves Brown forest soil Free Drift and till
Tarveskel Skeletal soil Variable Very shallow drift and residual
Thistlyhill Brown forest soil with gleying Imperfect Drift and till
Tillypronie Humus iron podzol Free Drift and till

 

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