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Carbon cycling

This page is no longer updated. The information presented here formed part of our previous areas of research. This has included research carried out on behalf of our research partners, commerical contracts and also the Scottish Goverment's Strategic research programme during the period 2011 - 2016.

Scottish Goverment LogoWe have left these pages here to provide background information on our previous areas of research. Further details on the RESAS strategic programme of research (2016-21) will be made available.

Further details on why we archive pages can be found on the following page.

Photograph of scientists collecting samples on East coast beach
We are collaborating with staff at Oceanlab in a number of projects. variety of ecological and societal needs

We are collaborating with staff at Oceanlab (Aberdeen University) in a number of projects, mainly involved with carbon cycling, covering both estuaries and the deep sea. This work is fundamental as deep sea sediments cover over half of the earths surface yet, for reasons such as accessibility, incredibly little is known about them including basic information such as mineralisation rates of organic C substrates.

Related publications

  • Food quality affects carbon cycling in the deep sea. - Mayor, D.J.; Thornton, B.; Witte, U.; Hay, S.Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences (BES), Research Day, University of Aberdeen, 8th December 2008.
  • Degradation of organic matter by a sub-arctic deep sea community: a pulse-chase experiment with 13C-labelled algae. - Gontikaki, E.; Mayor, D.J.; Narayanaswamy, B.E.; Thornton, B.; Witte, U. - American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Aquatic Sciences Meeting, Nice, 25-30 January 2009.
  • Food quality affects carbon cycling in the deep sea. - Mayor, D.J.; Thornton, B.; Witte, U.; Hay, S. - Stable Isotope Mass Spectrometry Users Group Meeting, University of Glasgow, 14-15 January 2009.
  • Food quality affects carbon cycling in deep sea sediments. - Mayor, D.J.; Thornton, B.; Hay, S.; Witte, U.- British Ecological Society Annual Meeting, University of Hertfordshire, UK, 8-10 September 2009.
  • Assimilation and turnover of essential substrates in a keystone organism, Calanus. - Mayor, D.J.; Cook, K.; Walsham, P.; Thornton, B.; Anderson, T.R. - British Ecological Society Annual Meeting, University of Hertfordshire, UK, 8-10 September 2009.
  • Carbon cycling in the deep sea. - Mayor, D.; Thornton, B.; Hay, S.; Witte, U. - Seminar presented to Fisheries Research Services, Marine Scotland, Marine Laboratory, Aberdeen, June 2009.
  • Absorption, fractionation and turnover of substrates in Calnus spp. - Mayor, D.J.; Cook, K.; Thornton, B.; Walsham, P.; Witte, U.; Zuur, A.; Anderson, A. - Functional Ecology. (in preparation)
  • Utilisation of different carbon sources in a shallow tidal estuary identified through the use of stable isotopes E. Zetsche, B. Thornton, A. Midwood and U. Witte
  • Food quality affects carbon cycling in the deep sea. Mayor, D.J.; Thornton, B.; Witte, U.; Hay, S
  • Deep-sea Benthic community response to a simulated sedimentation event off the Scottish Continental margin Gontikaki, E.; Mayor, D.J.; Narayanaswamy, B.E.; Thornton, B.; Witte, U.

Who is working in this area?

Barry Thornton

Research

Areas of Interest


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The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.