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Peter Cock

Staff picture: Peter Cock
Controlling Weeds, Pests and Diseases
Peter.Cock@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)844 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Invergowrie
Dundee DD2 5DA
Scotland UK

I joined the Institute in 2008, where I have been doing comparative genetics and other bioinformatics work, with a particular focus on viruses and nematodes (for example, a project to sequence the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida, an economically important plant pest here in Scotland).

Current research interests 

My applied work on particular plant pathogens requires programming and scripting. My language of choice is Python, and since my PhD I have used and contributed to the Biopython libraries. Biology is becoming increasingly a big-data science, with technologies like microarrays and now high throughput sequencing, and dealing with this kind of data and associated tools and file formats forms a large part of my work. I try to release most of my code as open source, mostly on GitHub but I also use Bitbucket (for example, my contributions to Galaxy). I started writing an (external) blog Blasted Bioinformatics!? on the hands-on computational side of my work in 2011.

Past research 

I completed my PhD at the University of Warwick's MOAC Doctoral Training Centre, titled Two-component regulation: modelling, predicting and identifying protein-protein interactions and assessing signalling networks of bacteria.

Bibliography 

The following list is manually curated, you can also try the semi-automatic list of my publications on Google Scholar (with citation counts of dubious accuracy), and I have registered ORCID 0000-0001-9513-9993.

 


  • Email: info@hutton.ac.uk
  • Phone: +44 (0)844 928 5428
  • Craigiebuckler Aberdeen AB15 8QH Scotland
  • Invergowrie Dundee DD2 5DA Scotland
A Scottish charitable company limited by guarantee. Registered in Scotland No SC374831.
Registered office: The James Hutton Institute, Invergowrie Dundee DD2 5DA. Charity No SCO41796

Printed from /staff/peter-cock on 28/07/14 09:28:31 PM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.