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Farming and biodiversity: Why do we think of it as a zero-sum game?

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"At this critical time, we have to get out there and get busy, explaining why biodiversity is a key part of the toolkit for addressing these global crises rather than a burden that we can’t afford to support"

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this blog post are the views of the author(s), and not an official position of the institute or funder.

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Hutton researchers promote the use of experimental economic methods

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"The goal was to promote the use of economic experiments in interdisciplinary research on land and resource use in rural Scotland"

By Peter Cock, James Gurd, Laure Kuhfuss and Simone Piras

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this blog post are the views of the author(s), and not an official position of the institute or funder.

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From Noticing Nature to Becoming Embedded in Nature: a journey with colleagues at the Institute

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"This change in human-nature relationships is a shift from passive enjoyment of the outdoors to becoming embedded in nature"

By Laura MacLean, Phoebe Somervail, Hannah Hasler, Anna Conniff and Kate Irvine

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this blog post are the views of the author(s), and not an official position of the institute or funder.

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Was Alfred Nobel right?

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"As we look ahead to COP15 maybe we need to take a leaf out of The Green Planet’s book and make sure we explain how our research can provide hope"

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this blog post are the views of the author(s), and not an official position of the institute or funder.

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It’s good to be out

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"The hope that all the direct engagement we see going on - no matter how big the tent - will strengthen people’s understanding of and commitment to protecting Scotland’s wild lands and wild places"

It’s been another busy summer in the Highlands. Recent drives through Glen Clunie and Glen Shee down to Perthshire have left me feeling conflicted. Glen Clunie in particular – with its easy road access and flat grassy patches next to the Clunie Water – has become a hotbed for wild camping, but in some cases not wild camping as I used to think of it. This is wild camping with a family size tent and accompanying barbecue gazebo, not sore feet, a tiny tent, a Trangia, and some Super Noodles.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this blog post are the views of the author(s), and not an official position of the institute or funder.

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What are the impacts of social innovation? Addressing the challenges of marginalised rural areas in Scotland and beyond

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Vicky Stonebridge is an artist & potter; this is her representation of the community relationship with the environment. (Image: Carla Barlagne)

By Carla Barlagne and Richard J. Hewitt

Social innovation is a phenomenon that manifests itself in new social relationships and collaborations. It seeks to promote the development and uptake of new services and new fields of activity, such as social entrepreneurship and social enterprises that improve the quality of life of individuals and communities, particularly in rural areas. Yet the evidence base of the impacts on the sustainable development of rural communities remains scarce.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this blog post are the views of the author(s), and not an official position of the institute or funder.

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The Water Between Us - Scott Herrett on discovering deliberation

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'Paying attention' from Eabhal - Uibhist a Tuath by Scott Herrett

Deliberation is the long and careful consideration of a subject. - In this house nothing is there by chance: it is always the result of great deliberation. Collins Dictionary

Have you heard of the 'deliberative wave' sweeping around the globe? This describes the increase interest and practice in forms of deliberative democracy to tackle politically difficult issues, such as abortion and the climate and ecological crisis.

Scotland’s Climate Citizen Assembly has just concluded and I’ve been observing the assembly sessions where over a hundred members of the public have been meeting to hear evidence, deliberate and make recommendations in response to the question ‘how should Scotland change to tackle the climate emergency in an effective and fair way?’. This blog is about why I believe we need more deliberative forums at every level in society because the traditional ways of making decisions on a local, national or global scale are no longer fit for purpose.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this blog post are the views of the author(s), and not an official position of the institute or funder.

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The challenge of a ghastly future

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A forest fire (Image by Bernabe Colohua from Pixabay)
"The unique challenge facing scientists is exactly how to pitch our message for maximum impact and to find the best way of telling it like it is"

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this blog post are the views of the author(s), and not an official position of the institute or funder.

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What we don’t know can be surprising

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Image by Rob Brooker
"We need to keep a tight hold on, or to find space for our curiosity to work"

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this blog post are the views of the author(s), and not an official position of the institute or funder.

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You could have it so much better…

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Image by Adrian Kirby/Pixabay
"We need to integrate biodiversity hotspots and enhancement into the wider landscape, and this is an area where Hutton research can and is delivering, as we develop more sustainable and biodiverse land management options"

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this blog post are the views of the author(s), and not an official position of the institute or funder.

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Printed from /blog on 08/08/22 11:35:31 PM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.