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barley

Improved genetic marker for precise and accurate EPH barley screening (News)

Researchers from the James Hutton Institute and the Scotch Whisky Research Institute (SWRI) have completed a ten-month InnovateUK funded project resulting in the development of an improved genetic marker that can be used by barley ... Read more

International Barley Hub shortlisted for VIBES climate change award (News)

The International Barley Hub, an initiative of the James Hutton Institute and the University of Dundee which aims to create a platform for the translation of barley research into commercial benefits for the entire brewing, whisky ... Read more

Barley in the spotlight at iBMW2018 meeting (News)

The use of barley genetic mutant resources to shed light into fundamental aspects of cereal biology was at the centre of discussions at the second International Barley Mutants Workshop 2018 (iBMW2018), held in Dundee with the atte ... Read more

Latest varieties and research on show at Cereals in Practice 2018 (News)

The latest cereal varieties and research will be on show at Saphock Farm in Aberdeenshire on Thursday 5th July for Cereals in Practice 2018, the annual cereals-themed event organised by the James Hutton Institute, Scotland's R ... Read more

Our work in the media: barley and social science (News)

The science of the James Hutton Institute continues to attract the interest of the media. This time, Professor Derek Stewart and Dr Andrew Copus were featured in recent BBC programmes, in which they discussed research on the nutri ... Read more

Cabinet Secretary Fergus Ewing visits to find out more about Hutton research and innovation (News)

Mr Fergus Ewing MSP, Cabinet Secretary for Rural Economy and Connectivity, today visited the James Hutton Institute in Aberdeen to hear about our world leading scientific research in crops and climate change, as well as its commer ... Read more

Scotland’s cereal connections boosted with Fellowship awards (News)

Dundee’s position as an international hub for research into cereals – particularly barley – has been given a boost with the award of a grant which will create new connections with Australia. The award of a &pou ... Read more

Novel genetic technique for improving barley (News)

On Burns Night, let’s raise a dram to better barley: scientists of Dundee’s International Barley Hub have developed an innovative genotyping array that allows the detailed genetic characterisation of any individual bar ... Read more

Cereals in Practice 2018 (Event)

Cereals in Practice is the annual showcase of variety trials and research organised by the James Hutton Institute, SRUC (Scotland's Rural College) and the Scottish Society for Crop Research. ... Read more

Barley scientists investigate solutions to grain skinning (News)

A University of Dundee scientist based at the James Hutton Institute has been awarded more than £600,000 to study an increasing problem with the cereal crop barley that impacts the commercially important malting process and ... Read more

Barley scientists discover path to improved grain quality (News)

Scientists from the International Barley Hub have discovered a genetic pathway to improved barley grain size and uniformity, a finding which may help breeders develop future varieties suited to the needs of growers and distillers. ... Read more

Understanding the living heritage of bere barley for a more sustainable future (News)

The profile of bere barley, its potential as a source of traits for human and environmental health and as a source of living heritage was highlighted at an event recently held on and around the mainland of Orkney, featuring a rang ... Read more

Understanding heritage barley for a more sustainable future (News)

Bere barley, a type of barley thought to be the oldest cereal in continuous commercial cultivation in the far north of Britain, may hold key genetic resources to allow plant breeders to tackle issues of agricultural sustainability ... Read more

Genetic secrets of Golden Promise barley unlocked (News)

Scientists from the International Barley Hub working in collaboration with brewing industry partners have unravelled the genetic secrets of Golden Promise, a popular malting barley variety in the 1970s and 1980s, in a drive to dev ... Read more

Better barley is on the way: crop genome unravelled (News)

An international scientific consortium has reported the first high-quality genome sequence of barley, a development which will assist crop breeders in developing more resilient barley varieties suited to the requirements of the br ... Read more

Crop research updates presented at BBSRC/KTN conference (News)

Drs Hazel Bull and Lionel Dupuy, from the James Hutton Institute, joined fellow scientists from across the UK in sharing crop research updates at the New Frontiers in Crop Research Conference, organised by the Biotechnology and Bi ... Read more

Lessons in adapting to climate change from one of the world’s oldest crops (News)

How did barley, a plant native to the Middle East and South-Western Asia, become able to be grown on land from just below the Arctic Circle to the equatorial highlands and southerly latitudes? The answer lies in the combined force ... Read more

Genome of 6,000-year-old barley grains sequenced for first time (News)

An international team of researchers from leading institutions in Scotland, Germany, Israel and the USA has succeeded for the first time in sequencing the genome of 6,000 year old barley grains from the Copper Age (the Chalcolithi ... Read more

Chris Law MP visits to find out more about our research and innovation (News)

Mr Chris Law, MP for Dundee West, visited the James Hutton Institute in Invergowrie to learn about exciting and innovative scientific research that is having considerable impact at home and abroad, as well as its commercial potent ... Read more

Executive Project Management Support
Administration
Capital Projects Manager
philip.gane@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Invergowrie
Dundee
DD2 5DA
Scotland UK

 

International Barley Hub project presented at UK Parliament (News)

Scientists from the James Hutton Institute were yesterday at the Houses of Parliament in London to make the case and win parliamentarians’ support for the International Barley Hub (IBH), a project that aims to create an uniq ... Read more

International Barley Hub (Page)

Barley is one of Scotland's most important crops and a fundamental component of many key industries, but yet remains a little-known harvest. This is surprising considering how important and influential Scotland's brewing a ... Read more

New light shed on microbial battleground between soil and roots (News)

The soil around roots of plants such as barley – one of our most important crops - is a battleground where only certain bacteria can survive, suggests evidence gathered by an international team including a scientist based at ... Read more

Cell and Molecular Sciences
Cell and Molecular Sciences
Research Scientist
mark.looseley@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Invergowrie
Dundee DD2 5DA
Scotland UK

 

Qualifications

  • BSc. Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, University of St Andrews (2002)
  • MSc. Quantitative Genetics and Genome Analysis, Edinburgh University (2003)
  • PhD. Environmental Genomics, University of St Andrews (2007)

Current research interests

The major focus of my current research is the identification and characterisation of host resistance to Rhynchosporium commune in barley, including both major gene mediated and partial resistance.  High genetic diversity in R. commune populations means that commercially deployed resistance may be overcome rapidly by the pathogen.  As such, an important focus of sustainable disease management is the discovery of novel, durable sources of resistance for use in new cultivars.  Potential sources of novel resistance that I am using include both wild relatives of barley, heritage varieties and elite cultivar collections.

Links with breeders (particularly) on the TSB funded SIBLINGS project ensure that these discoveries can be quickly exploited for improving the resistance of commercially grown barley to R. commune.

In this research, I have used high density SNP maps along with field and controlled environment testing to identify and map novel resistance genes and resistance QTL.  However, a major area that I am currently developing is the use of new phenotyping technologies and methods to allow to direct observation the interaction between host and pathogen at all stages of disease development; not just when symptoms become visible.  Molecular detection methods such as qPCR, and microscopic approaches along with image analysis techniques have been are currently being explored in this work.

Bibliography

  • Fitt, B.D.L.; Atkins, S.D.; Fraaije, B.A.; Lucas, J.A.; Newton, A.C.; Looseley, M.E.; Werner, P.; Harrap, D.; Ashworth, M.; Southgate, J.; Phillips, H.; Gilchrist. A., (2012) Role of inoculum sources in Rhynchosporium population dynamics and epidemics on barley., HGCA Project Report No 486, 46pp.
  • Newton, A.C.; Avrova, A.O.; Thirugnanasambandam, A.; Looseley, M., (2011) Asymptomatic infection - the Trojan horse of crop production., Annual Report of the Scottish Crop Research Institute for 2010, pp14-15.

Dundee Flower and Food Festival 2014 (Event)

The James Hutton Institute is once again supporting the Dundee Flower and Food Festival and will have a display and talks in the new Food Discovery Marquee. Our display will be looking at the past, present and future of plant and ... Read more

Developments on arable crops showcased at Cereals in Practice (News)

How to protect cereal crops from the increased disease pressure caused by the mild winter and spring and early drilling was a key point of interest at this year’s Cereals in Practice event, co-hosted by the James Hutton Inst ... Read more

Royal Highland Show 2014 (Event)

The James Hutton Institute will once again be inviting visitors to join them at their marquee during the Royal Highland Show where we will be showcasing the contribution our science and research makes to the continuing success of ... Read more

'Collaborative roots' could reduce reliance on phosphorus fertilisers (News)

Farmers could improve the efficiency of phosphorus in crop production by coupling plants with complementary traits, which would allow them to harness the ‘phosphorus bank’ already present in soils. ... Read more

Work underway to improve malting barley quality (News)

Researchers at the James Hutton Institute and leading commercial breeding companies are working to improve the quality of winter barley for malting purposes, in a bid to address the concerns of maltsters, brewers and distillers ab ... Read more

The Rrs1 resistance locus against scald in barley (Event)

Dr Bianca Buttner, Bavarian State Research Centre for Agriculture, Institute for Crop Science and Plant Breeding, Germany will give this seminar entitled "The Rrs1 resistance locus against scald in barley" at the James H ... Read more

Impact of gene on crop development could boost cereal yields (News)

The productivity of major crops such as barley could get a boost in the future thanks to discoveries in the inner workings of genes and how they influence crop development, a new study from the James Hutton Institute and the Unive ... Read more

Barley and brewing: a matter of taste (Event)

Scotland Food and Drink in partnership with the James Hutton Institute and Interface Food and Drink will host this event ‘Barley and brewing; a matter of taste’ at the James Hutton Institute in Dundee. Featuring Alex ... Read more

£1.25 million for cereals research (News)

The James Hutton Institute has been awarded £1.25 million for projects to help improve the quality and reliability of malting barley, increase knowledge of root development and identify disease resistance in barley. The awa ... Read more

Barley Transformation (Research Page)

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Functional Genomics (Research Page)

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Fourth International Workshop on Barley Leaf Blights (Event)

The Fourth International Workshop on Barley Leaf Blights was hosted by The James Hutton Institute. It was held at the West Park Conference Centre, Dundee from 27-29 June 2011. Papers and abstracts You can download a copy of th ... Read more


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The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.