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The Macaulay Development Trust seeks to play a role in helping us to have relevant, excellent science. You can join us in this endeavour: whether you are a researcher or institution, working to improve and inform the sustainability of land management; or a Charity or NGO looking for a partner with whom to work, we would like to hear from you.

Watch the 41st TB Macaulay Lecture by Professor Jacqueline McGlade: Natural prosperity in an age of global change (News)

The 41st T.B. Macaulay Lecture, given by Professor Jacqueline McGlade on the topic of natural prosperity and innovative solutions for a business-unusual approach to rapid global change, is now available to watch online. In the l ... Read more

Join us for the 41st T.B. Macaulay Lecture: The challenge of sustainable development (News)

We have recently lived through three years in a row of the hottest temperatures recorded worldwide, a clear sign that our climate is changing, and changing fast. Is this enough to spur us into tackling climate change and other sus ... Read more

41st T.B. Macaulay Lecture - The Challenge of Sustainable Development: From global UN policy to local community survival in the face of climate change (Event)

Each year the Macaulay Development Trust, in partnership with the James Hutton Institute, hosts a world-renowned guest speaker for its annual TB Macaulay lecture. This year we have been lucky enough to secure Professor Jacqueline ... Read more

Prosperity without growth: is it possible? Watch the 40th Macaulay Lecture on our YouTube channel (News)

Is economic growth the solution to our challenges? Will it really deliver prosperity and wellbeing for a rapidly growing global population and allow us to live on a planet with finite resources? Should our prosperity be measured b ... Read more

Better support for renewable energy decision making (News)

Anaerobic digestion, a process by which micro-organisms break down biodegradable material in the absence of oxygen leading to the production of biogas and bio-fertilisers, is an increasingly relevant source of renewable electricit ... Read more

Study to expand knowledge of ectomycorrhizal fungi in Scotland (News)

Researchers at the James Hutton Institute and the University of Aberdeen are exploring the relationship between ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi and native tree species in Scotland. The study will also determine which climatic and envi ... Read more

Improved isotopic analysis capabilities for unrivalled precision and accuracy (News)

The James Hutton Institute is reinforcing its extensive analytical chemistry capabilities for research and commercial work through an £500K investment on a new Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometer, which will allow the Insti ... Read more

Prosperity without growth: is it possible, and could it answer economic challenges in Scotland? (News)

Is economic growth the solution to our challenges? Will it really deliver prosperity and wellbeing for a rapidly growing global population and allow us to live on a planet with finite resources? Should our prosperity be measured b ... Read more

Digital mapping techniques to improve knowledge of British soils (News)

Soil scientists at the James Hutton Institute are working to create the first unified digital map of soil properties within Great Britain, a development which will contribute to worldwide Global Soil Map projects and improve the d ... Read more

Professor Tim Jackson announced as speaker of 40th TB Macaulay Lecture (News)

Tim Jackson, Professor of Sustainable Development at the University of Surrey and Director of the Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity (CUSP), has been announced as the speaker of the 40th T.B. Macaulay Lecture, ... Read more

40th T.B. Macaulay Lecture - Prosperity Without Growth: Foundations for the Economy of Tomorrow (Event)

Tim Jackson, Professor of Sustainable Development at the University of Surrey and Director of the Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity (CUSP), will deliver the 40th T.B. Macaulay Lecture, which will take place fo ... Read more

Environmental and Biochemical Sciences
Environmental and Biochemical Sciences
Postdoctoral Researcher
zisis.gagkas@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

I am Macaulay Development Trust (MDT) Postdoctoral Fellow with a research background in catchment and soil hydrology and geospatial analysis working on the application of Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) techniques to hydropedology. My research aims to use DSM techniques to map water regulatory functions of soils in order to improve the predictions of river flows and solute movement through soils and substrates and as input to models of soil functions and environmental risk assessments.

Current research interests

  • Improve the spatial prediction of the Hydrology of Soil Types (HOST) classification system designed to predict river flows and as input into national scale risk mapping by using DSM techniques and machine-learning algorithms (e.g. Random Forests classifier).
  • Develop DSM techniques relevant to predicting water flow through soils by incorporating soil morphological data and explore methods to estimate their statistical uncertainty.

Past research

  • Water Resources Management of Coastal Agricultural Environments - Resilience of Climate Change Impacts (AGROCLIMA)" (funded under Cooperation 2011/General Secretariat of Education and Research, Greece).
  • Participatory multi-Level Earth Observation-assisted tools for Irrigation water management and Agricultural Decision-Support (PLEIADES ) (funded by EU FP6).
  • Proactive Management of water systems to face drought and water scarcity in islands and coastal areas of the Mediterranean (PRODIM) (funded by EU INTERREG II).
  • Effect of broadleaf woodland cover on streamwater chemistry and risk assessments of streamwater acidification in acid-sensitive catchments in the UK (PhD research funded by the Greek State Scholarship foundation, University of Edinburgh).

Bibliography

  • Poggio, L.; Gimona, A.; Gagkas, Z.; Lilly, A., (2018) 3D digital soil mapping for Scottish soils using remote sensing., Internal Report for RESAS.

  • Poggio, L.; Gimona, A.; Gagkas, Z.; Lilly, A., (2018) 3D digital soil mapping for Scottish soils using remote sensing., Internal Report for RESAS.

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Macaulay Development Trust Fellowship
jessica.maxwell@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)1224 395 403

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Current research interests

Jessica's current research informs planning theory, policy and practice through collaborative partnerships with academics, planning professionals and policymakers.  

Jessica is currently working with colleagues Katherine Irvine, Scott Herrett and Laure Kufuss in collaboration with five partner organisations on a project funded by the European Observation Network for Territorial Development and Cohesion (ESPON). The project is referred to as ‘GReen infrastructure: Enhancing biodiversity and ecosysTem services for territoriAl development’ (GRETA). The GRETA project aims to develop a comprehensive knowledge base for enhancing green infrastructure to benefit territorial development in different European regions and cities.

Jessica is also currently working within an interdisciplinary team on a project analysing how policy instruments shape soil, water and biodiversity, which is funded by the Scottish Government Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services (RESAS) Strategic Research Programme (SRP) 2016-2021. 

Jessica was invited to join the 2018 International Network of Resource Information Centres (aka The Balaton Group) Meeting on 'The Role of Education and Learning in Sustainability: How We Engage'.

New paper recently published in Environmental Science and Policy 'Engaging end-users to inform the development of the global standard for the identification of key biodiversity areas' - freely available for 50 days here.

Bibliography

Environmental and Biochemical Sciences
Environmental and Biochemical Sciences
Digital Mineralogist
benjamin.butler@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)1224 395355

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen
AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Current research interests

  • Soil property - mineralogy relationships
  • Application of data mining to XRPD data
  • Application of cluster analysis to XRPD data
  • High throughput soil mineral quantification
  • Soil and sea ice mineralogy

Past research

Mineral dynamics in sea ice: Benjamin's PhD research investigated the mineralogy and geochemistry of sea ice. This research used controlled laboratory experiments and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (Diamond Light Source) to elucidate the presence, persistence and significance of authigenic minerals in sea ice, as well as defining major physico-chemical properties of the sea ice system.

Bibliography

  • Nolan, A J.; Hewison, R.L.; Beesley, L.; Henderson, D.J.; Riach, D.J.; Donnelly, D.; Butler, B., (2018) Soil Survey Digital Map Data and Technical Reports, Scale 1:10,000, Volume 103 - Drumnatorran Forest Blocks, Lochaber Forest District (2017)., Digital soils data uploaded into 'Forester' and Technical Report to Forestry Commission.

39th TB Macaulay Lecture on sustainable development goals now available to watch online (News)

The publication of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals in 2015 was the expression of a global consensus to follow a pathway to a better future. The 17 goals and the 169 targets indicate areas where progress is ... Read more

Working together for better outcomes – guidance notes now available (News)

The organisers of a workshop in which organisations from all across the UK came together to discuss better collaboration when tackling interdisciplinary research have published a body of guidance notes, intended to supply advice a ... Read more

Finding out about the "hidden uses" of soil data (News)

A Macaulay Development Trust funded PhD student, based between the James Hutton Institute and Cranfield University, is seeking information from individuals and organisations about their utilisation of soils data, in a drive to imp ... Read more

Environmental and Biochemical Sciences
Environmental and Biochemical Sciences
Business Sector Leader - Enviroment
richard.allan@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)1382 568952

The James Hutton Institute
Invergowrie
Dundee
DD2 5DA

 

Current research interests

Richard`s current focus is on sustainable rural water systems which includes:

  • Decentralized wastewater treatment systems
  • Anaerobic digestion
  • Water Safety Planning
  • Removal of substances of high concern and natural organic matter from drinking water

Bibliography

Information and Computational Sciences
Information and Computational Sciences
MDT Research Fellow in Remote Sensing
pauline.miller@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Pauline joined the James Hutton Institute in early 2015 as a Research Fellow in Remote Sensing. She is a geomatics research scientist with more than ten years experience across a range of techniques and application domains. She specialises in the development of geospatial methodologies and solutions for challenges in the earth and environmental sciences.

Bibliography

Learning Landscape Partnerships (Project)

Despite many decades of research within protected area landscapes, many protected area management organisations struggle to use scientific expertise in their management and decision making processes. The project has been funded by ... Read more

Host Identity and Climate as Determinants of Ectomycorrhizal Fungal Distribution in Scotland (Research Page)

Background Over 85% of land plants are obligate associated with mycorrhizal fungi illustrating the importance of the symbiosis. Fungi provide water and essential nutrients to their host plants in exchange for carbohydrates deriv ... Read more


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The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.