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SEGS

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Applied Economist
nazli.koseoglu@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)
 

Bibliography

  • Tindale, S.J.; Roberts, M.; Koseoglu, N.; Novo, P.; Kyle, C.; Byg, A.; Faccioli, M.; Komossa, F.; Schaller, L.; Slee, B.; Villanueva, A.J.; Zasada, I.; Viaggi, D. (2018) Evaluation of the co-construction research process., Report for PROVIDE (PROVIding smart DElivery of public goods by EU agriculture and forestry), Deliverable D2.5. Final Version, August 2018, 44pp.
  • Roberts, M.; Kyle, C.; Tindale, S.; Koseoglu, N.; Schaller, L.; Targetti, S.; Ratinger, T.; Villanueva, A.J.; Zagorska, K.; Komossa, F. (2018) Report on practicability and transferability., Report for Provide (PROViding smart dElivery of public goods by EU agriculture and forestry), Deliverable D5.3., 313pp.

  • Tindale, S.J.; Roberts, M.; Koseoglu, N.; Novo, P.; Kyle, C.; Byg, A.; Faccioli, M.; Komossa, F.; Schaller, L.; Slee, B.; Villanueva, A.J.; Zasada, I.; Viaggi, D. (2018) Evaluation of the co-construction research process., Report for PROVIDE (PROVIding smart DElivery of public goods by EU agriculture and forestry), Deliverable D2.5. Final Version, August 2018, 44pp.
  • Roberts, M.; Kyle, C.; Tindale, S.; Koseoglu, N.; Schaller, L.; Targetti, S.; Ratinger, T.; Villanueva, A.J.; Zagorska, K.; Komossa, F. (2018) Report on practicability and transferability., Report for Provide (PROViding smart dElivery of public goods by EU agriculture and forestry), Deliverable D5.3., 313pp.

Newbie UK Case Studies (Project)

  Case Studies in the UK TEXT     Key contacts Lee-Ann Sutherland    Adam Calo Follow @newbieuk ... Read more

Pint of Science: Bringing scientific research down the local (News)

​Scientists from the James Hutton Institute will shortly take part in the world’s largest festival of public science talks, a Pint of Science. The three-day festival begins on 20 May and aims to encourage everyone to head ... Read more

The Newbie Award (Project)

NEWBIE 2018 Award Results Lynbreck Croft, a 150-acre mixed habitat croft enterprise located in the Cairngorms National Park, has been declared winner of the NEWBIE UK award for New Entrant Farm Business of the Year and will be p ... Read more

NEWBIE - Background (Project)

In NEWBIE, “new entrants” are defined as anyone who starts a new farm business or becomes involved in an existing farm business. They comprise a wide range of ages, agricultural experience and resource access. Newcomer ... Read more

Learning and Change Through Monitor Farms (Project)

This research explores principles underlying learning and change in relation to facilitated peer-to-peer learning opportunities, such as Monitor Farms. In this work we reflect on features associated with successful on-farm demonst ... Read more

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Postdoctoral Researcher
adam.calo@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)1224395407
 

Current research interests

NEWBIE - New Entrant netWork: Business models for Innovation, entrepreneurship and resilience in European agriculture (2018-2021)

EPIC: The Scottish Government's Centre for Expertise on Animal Disease Outbreaks. ST2.4.1 Understanding attitudes to biosecurity: Exploring the challenges of bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) detection and response. This work will explore how cattle farmers in the Scotland are experiencing the scheme to eradicate BVD. Work will feed into the next phase of the BVD eradication scheme. Research is carried out through qualitative interviews and audio visual ethnographic methods

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social Scientist in Agricultural Innovation
christina.noble@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)
 

I am a qualitative social scientist in the Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences Group, joining in 2018. I have a background in human geography, and enjoy research in rural areas working with different land users in the countryside. My current role explores agricultural innovation, exploring ways in which to help farmers move towards more sustainable practices. 

 

Current research interests

  • SALSA: Small farms, small food businesses and food security and nutrition, European Commission-funded H2020 project

 

  • AGRILINK: Farmer advisory services and the uptake of precision farming in North-East Scotland , European Commission-funded H2020 project

 

 

 

Past research

  • Transparency of Land Ownership in Scotland, International Comparisons for Scotland,  Scottish Government 2018

Bibliography

  • Duckett, D.; Kyle, C.; Maxwell, J.; Noble, C. (2018) Report of the SALSA Regional Workshop RR30 (Lochaber, Skye & Lochalsh, Arran & Cumbrae, Argyll & Bute), The Moorings Hotel, Fort William, 24 May 2018, 14pp.,

  • Duckett, D.; Kyle, C.; Maxwell, J.; Noble, C. (2018) Report of the SALSA Regional Workshop RR30 (Lochaber, Skye & Lochalsh, Arran & Cumbrae, Argyll & Bute), The Moorings Hotel, Fort William, 24 May 2018, 14pp.,

UnderStory - Storying woodland use, management and expansion in the Cairngorms (Project)

A digital story map will be created called the UnderStory and will provide an engaging, enduring account of perspectives on woodland use, management and expansion in the early 21st Century from the Cairngorms.It will be created ou ... Read more

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Agricultural / Rural Economist
simone.piras@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Bibliography

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Human Geographer
vanessa.burns@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Vanessa Burns joined the James Hutton Institute in September 2018, having previously held a lecturing position in human environmental geography at Stanford University. Vanessa has a DPhil in Geography and the Environment from the University of Oxford, an MA from the University of New South Wales, and a BA (1st Class Hons and University Medal) from the University of Technology Sydney.

Current research interests

Vanessa is currently working on a number of projects across regions in Europe and Africa. Her work includes analysis of emergent governance forms in small-scale and subsistance agriculture as part of the  EU H2020 funded SALSA project on small farms and food security. She is also researching local resistance to adaptation technologies in water catchment areas in Scotland as part of a collaboration of scientists and stakeholders led by the Hutton Institute (PESLES). Vanessa has recently started work on the EU H2020 funded AgriLink project, investigating the role of farm advisory regimes in Europe. She is also co-leading an initiative to coordinate and promote climate change research across the James Hutton Institute.

Past research

Vanessa's past research has been interdisciplinary, conducting geographically informed research across the fields of environmental law and governance, legal history, environmental anthropology,  oceanography, marine biology and climate science. Past research projects have spanned a broad range of topics, including the political ecology of pastural landscapes in Australia, Indigenous human-environment relations, nonhuman rights in historic and emergent legal frameworks, and boundary-making practices in environmental science and governance. While diverse, these topics are tied together through an interest in disciplinary, local, and institutional epistemologies of Nature and the ways in which these faciliate or obstruct effective governance of environmental change.

Bibliography

  • Burns, V. (2011) Climate and agency: Post-humanist geographies and environmental change., In: Cotton, M. & Heisler Motta, B. (ed.). Engaging with Environmental Justice: Governance, Education and Citizenship, Inter-Disciplinary Press, Oxford, UK, Part VI.
  • Burns, V. (2010) Latour's "Parliament of things": the problem of anthropocentrism in global climate change governance., International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, 6, 81-88.

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Environmental Social Scientist
alice.hague@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Alice is an environmental social scientist in the Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences group. Her research takes an interdisciplinary approach, and focuses broadly on community engagement with environmental issues and climate change.

Current research interests

  • Community participation and consideration of ecosystem services
  • Community engagement with climate change mitigation and adaptation
  • Social understandings, discourse, and interaction with nature and biodiversity
     

Past research

Alice joined the James Hutton Institute in May 2018 after completing her PhD at the University of Edinburgh. Her earlier research investigated the engagement of Christian faith communities in environmental issues, with a particular focus on the motivations for, and practices of, local-level environmental action.

Bibliography

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
PhD Student
irma.arts@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Irma is a PhD researcher in Conservation Science at the University of Aberdeen, in cooperation with the Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences research group of the James Hutton Institute. She completed a BSc in Biology at the Radboud University in Nijmegen and a MSc in Development and Rural Innovation at Wageningen University. After working at an applied university and the Dutch forestry commission she went back to the university to complete a postgraduate studies in Education. 

Current research interests

Irma’s PhD research is focused on understanding the interactions between people, technology and nature. She is working on a qualitative study to understand the way digital technology is involved in outdoor activities and how this is linked to people’s identities and values. She is supervised by Anke Fischer and Dominic Duckett of the James Hutton Institute and René van der Wal of the University of Aberdeen.

As a qualified teacher Irma is, next to her PhD research, also interested in education, specifically in incorporating outdoor education into the curriculum and innovating learning environments. 

Past research

Past research has focused on conflicts in nature conservation, looking at deliberative and participatory processes and legitimacy of governance practices. For the Dutch forestry commission she has researched interactions and conflicts between people and (re-introduced) fauna. 

Emotional openness key for STEM researchers (News)

What makes a good scientist? What qualities are assets for success in the highly competitive and challenging environment of science? An outdated stereotype often paints a picture that all scientists are cold, hard, unemotional... ... Read more

AgriLink - Connecting farmers, advisers and researchers for productive and sustainable agriculture (Project)

AgriLink is a project funded by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme. The project aims to help stimulate the transition towards more sustainable agriculture by improving understanding of the role ... Read more

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Research Assistant - Mixed Methods
ruth.wilson@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Ruth is a research assistant in the Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences (SEGS) group. She has a PhD in Sociology from the University of Aberdeen and is passionate about understanding people and society through the creative use of mixed methods.

Ruth works on projects about demographic change in remote areas, place-based policy and community resilience.

Current research interests

  • Lived experiences of remote, rural and island societies and cultures
  • Community dynamics, identity and belonging
  • The relationship betwen technological and social change

Ongoing projects

Past research

Ruth's PhD explored the nature of rural social relations in an increasingly digitised world. Prior to joining the James Hutton Institute in 2017, she was involved in an AHRC-funded project, with the University of Manchester, about understanding everyday cultural participation, particularly in rural and island societies.

In a previous research career, Ruth worked at the University of Strathclyde in the area of digital libraries, information retrieval and electronic book design.

Bibliography

Land access a key barrier for new entrants to farming (News)

Scottish farming needs to attract a steady flow of young farmers and new entrants to maintain the vitality of its agricultural sector. The available statistics show that most farmers (54.92%) are over 55 years of age. The proporti ... Read more

Connections between greenspace and residents to be explored in Cumbernauld project (News)

Researchers at the James Hutton Institute have become important partners in a project which aims to improve green spaces in a Lanarkshire town. Cumbernauld Living Landscape, a partnership between the Scottish Wildlife Trust, Nor ... Read more

NEFERTITI: Networking European Farms to Enhance Cross Fertilisation and Innovation Uptake through Demonstration (2018-2021) (Project)

NEFERTITI will establish an EU-wide highly connected network of well-specified demonstration and pilot farms, which is designed to enhance thematic knowledge exchange, cross fertilisation among actors and efficient innovation upta ... Read more

NEWBIE - New Entrant netWork: Business models for Innovation, entrepreneurship and resilience in European agriculture (2018-2021) (Project)

Project Overview The overall goal of the NEWBIE network is to enable new entrants to successfully establish sustainable farm businesses in Europe. ... Read more

The Challenge of Marginal Land: efficient utilisation of the managed natural environment (Event)

Glensaugh and three other research farms managed by the James Hutton Institute provide a valuable long term platform to meet the research needs of the Scottish Government's Strategic Research Programme. ... Read more

Monitoring and Evaluation for Ecosystem Management (MEEM) - Comparing theory and practice across Europe (Project)

Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) is an essential part of the process of adaptive management, the process of learning from our actions in order to update and improve future ecosystem management.  Across Europe we have a n ... Read more

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social Scientist
irianna.vlachopoulou@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Irianna is a social scientist in governance and institutional analysis working in the Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences Group.

Current research interests

SALSA - Small Farms, Small Food Businesses and Sustainable Food Security

The Horizon 2020 project (H2020 – 677363) aims to provide a better understanding of the current and potential contribution of small farms and food businesses to sustainable food and nutrition security. It pioneers a novel integrated multi-method approach in 30 regions in Europe and Africa, using the most recent satellite technologies, transdisciplinary approaches, food systems mapping and participatory foresight analysis.

RESAS Research Programme (2016-2021) Scottish Rural Industries response to changes - Work package 2.4.2: Agricultural restructuring and farm diversification

This project involves qualitative and quantitative analysis of the uptake of innovative and diversification activities at the farm level in response to changes such as the CAP reforms or the Brexit as well as the global engagement of farmers.

Bibliography

  • Matsuda, H.; Makino, M.; Vlachopoulou, E.I. (2018) Local knowledge and the Shiretoko World Natural Heritage: Shiretoko fishers and researchers., In: Sato, T. & Kikuchi, N. (eds.). Transdisciplinary Local Environment Studies: Co-creating Knowledge Base for Societal Transformation Toward Sustainability. Tokyo University Press, Tokyo. (in Japanese).
  • Mizuta, D.D.; Vlachopoulou, E.I. (2017) Satoumi concept illustrated by sustainable bottom-up initiatives of Japanese Fisheries Cooperative Associations., Marine Policy, 78, 143-149.
  • Vlachopoulou, E.I.; Makino, M. (2017) The path to sustainable fisheries and the transformative impact of the Shiretoko World Natural Heritage Site., In: Armitage, D., Charles, A. & Berkes, F. (eds). Governing the Coastal Commons: Communities, Resilience and Transformation. Routledge, New York and London.
  • Vlachopoulou, E.I.; Makino, M.; Matsuda, H. (2014) Fisheries vs marine conservation: Lessons learned from the Shiretoko World Natural Heritage Site., Roczniki Socjologii Morskieej : Annuals of Marine Sociology, 23, 36-43.
  • Vlachopoulou, E.I.; Wilson, A.M.; Miliou, A. (2013) Disconnects in EU and Greek fishery policies and practices in the eastern Aegean Sea and impacts on Posidonia oceanica meadows., Ocean and Coastal Management, 76, 105-113.

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Rural & Agricultural Economist
carla barlagne@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Carla Barlagne is a researcher in agricultural and rural economics working in the Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences (SEGS) research group at the James Hutton Institute.

She has a background in agronomy, agricultural economics and behavioural economics. Prior to joining The James Hutton Institute she has received her PhD from The University of the French West Indies and the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA) and carried a one-year postdoc at INRA (Guadeloupe, French West Indies/Paris, France).

Current research interests

  • SIMRA: H2020 project Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA No: 677622 - SIMRA – RIA, Topic: ISIB-03-2015 - Unlocking the growth potential of rural areas through enhanced governance and social innovation (SI); duration: April 2016-2020) funded by the European Commission (EUR 5 577.203,75 Euros) http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/200385_en.html  and www.simra-h2020.eu. The SIMRA project seeks to fill a knowledge gap in understanding and enhancing SI in marginalised rural areas by advancing the state-of-the-art in SI and connected governance mechanisms in agriculture and forestry sectors and in rural development in general. Carla’s contributes to this project by having scientific coordination activities as well as research activities. Her research question focuses on understanding of the factors and conditions of emergence, uptake and diffusion of social innovation in the forestry and agro-forestry sector.
  • RESAS Research Programme (2016-2021):Scottish Rural Industries response to changes. Work package 2.4.2. : Agricultural restructuring and farm diversification. This project involves qualitative and quantitative analysis of the uptake of innovative and diversification activities at the farm level in response to changes such as the CAP reforms or the Brexit as well as the global engagement of farmers.
  • RESAS Research Programme(2016-2021). Work package 2.3.2. Protecting the genetic diversity of key resources in Scotland. This work involves understanding the links between the management of the agrobiodiversity of potatoes and the resilience of the food chain.

Past research

  • Foresight study on Guadeloupean agriculture up to the horizon 2040:(COREDEF – PRDAR 2009-2013) (Strategic Committee for Research, Training and Development - Regional Program for Agricultural Development and European Regional Development Funded project). Carla has been the project manager of as well as scientific contributor to the study. With a panel of experts and a multidisciplinary team of scientists and consultants, she documented the past tendencies of Guadeloupean agriculture, identified its current driving forces and explored its alternative futures.
  • Fostering innovation in agricultural sectors: developing an integrated approach to quality in the yam sector in Guadeloupe:(AgroEcoTrop-FEDER project: European Regional Development Funded project). In Carla’s PhD project, she explored the conditions for the uptake of innovative sustainable yam products and a better match of the demand and supply sides. Her focus was on understanding and eliciting farmers and intermediaries’ productive and commercial strategies as well as consumers’ expectations and willingness to pay for sustainable characteristics of yams.
  • Agronomic diagnosis of yam production in Guadeloupe: Process of yam yield build-upFEADER-PDR (European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development - Regional Development Plan) 2007-2013. In this project, Carla conducted on farms trials at a regional level to understand the factors (biophysical and management practices) affecting yam yield.

Bibliography

  • Sutherland, L-A.; Barlagne, C.; Barnes, A. (2019) Beyond hobby farming: towards a typology of non-commercial farming., Agriculture and Human Values. Published online.
  • Hewitt, R.J.; Bradley, N.; Baggio Compagnucci, A.; Barlagne, C.; Ceglarz, A.; Cremades, R.; McKeen, M.; Otto, I.M.; Slee, B. (2019) Social innovation in community energy in Europe: a review of the evidence., Frontiers in Energy Research: Energy Systems and Policy, 7, Article No. 31.
  • Sarkki, S.; Ficko, A.; Miller, D.R.; Barlagne, C.; Melnykovych, M.; Jokinen M.; Soloviy I.; Nijnik, M. (2019) Human values as catalysts and consequences of social innovations., Forest Policy and Economics, 104, 33-44.
  • Barlagne, C. (2019) Challenges and opportunities of genetic agrodiversity in the potato sector Scotland., Final Report to RESAS, 15pp.
  • Kyle, C.; Duckett, D.; Barlagne, C. (2018) What will the Scottish potato sector look like in 2040 and will varietal diversity be important?, Report of a Workshop, Doubletree Hilton, Dundee, 13 December 2018, 12pp.
  • Msika, J.; Barlagne, C.; Hewitt, R.; Nijnik, M. (2018) Social innovation in rural areas in Scotland., Workshop Report, Social Innovation in Rural Areas in Scotland, James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, 31 May 2018, 13pp.
  • Kyle, C.; Duckett, D.; Barlagne, C. (2018) Protecting genetic diversity of Scotland's potatoes., Report on the Workshop held at the James Hutton Institute, Dundee, 21 January 2018, 17pp.
  • Barlagne, C.; Sutherland, L.-A. (2017) Non-commercial farming in Scotland., Report for Deliverable 2.4.2.
  • Secco, K.; Pisani, E.; Burlando, C.; Da Re, R.; Gatto, P.; Pettenella, D.; Vassilopoulus, A.; Akinsete, E.; Koundouri, P.; Lopolito, A.; Prosperi, M.; Tuomasiukka, D.; Den Herde, M.; Lovric, M.; Polman, N.; Dijkshoorn, M.; Soma, K.; Ludvig, A.; Weiss, G.; Zivojinovic, I.; Sarkki, S.; Ravazzoli, E.; Dalla Torre, C.; Streifeneder, T.; Slee, W.; Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.; Barlagne C.; Prokofieva, I. (2017) Set of methods to assess SI implications at different levels: instructions for WPs 5 & 6., Deliverable 4.2, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp203.
  • Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M.; Barlagne, C. (2017) Minutes of 1st General Assembly., Deliverable 8.4, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp23.
  • Ludvig, A.; Weiss, G.; Zivojinovic, I.; Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R.; Barlagne, C.; Perlik, M.; Hermann, P.; Egger, T.; Torre C.D.; Streifeneder, T.; Ravazzoli, E.; Sfeir, P.; Lukesch, R.; Wagner, K.; Egartner, S.; Clotteau, M. (2017) Political framework conditions, policies and instruments for SIs in rural areas., Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas, Deliverable 6.1, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp36.
  • Barlagne, C.; Bryce, R.; Valero, D.; Price, M.; Mosdale, L.; Clotteau, M.; Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M. (2017) Ethical approvals for research with human participants in the SIMRA Project, Deliverable 9.5., Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp.29.
  • Duckett, D.; Barlagne, C.; Kyle, C. (2017) Report of the workshop exploring the genetic diversity of potatoes for enhanced resilience of the potato sector., The James Hutton Institute, Report to Stakeholder Group, 5pp.
  • Barlagne, C.; Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M. (2017) Ethical clearance procedures in SIMRA., Deliverable 1.5, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), pp65.

  • Barlagne, C. (2019) Challenges and opportunities of genetic agrodiversity in the potato sector Scotland., Final Report to RESAS, 15pp.
  • Kyle, C.; Duckett, D.; Barlagne, C. (2018) What will the Scottish potato sector look like in 2040 and will varietal diversity be important?, Report of a Workshop, Doubletree Hilton, Dundee, 13 December 2018, 12pp.
  • Msika, J.; Barlagne, C.; Hewitt, R.; Nijnik, M. (2018) Social innovation in rural areas in Scotland., Workshop Report, Social Innovation in Rural Areas in Scotland, James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, 31 May 2018, 13pp.
  • Kyle, C.; Duckett, D.; Barlagne, C. (2018) Protecting genetic diversity of Scotland's potatoes., Report on the Workshop held at the James Hutton Institute, Dundee, 21 January 2018, 17pp.
  • Barlagne, C.; Sutherland, L.-A. (2017) Non-commercial farming in Scotland., Report for Deliverable 2.4.2.
  • Secco, K.; Pisani, E.; Burlando, C.; Da Re, R.; Gatto, P.; Pettenella, D.; Vassilopoulus, A.; Akinsete, E.; Koundouri, P.; Lopolito, A.; Prosperi, M.; Tuomasiukka, D.; Den Herde, M.; Lovric, M.; Polman, N.; Dijkshoorn, M.; Soma, K.; Ludvig, A.; Weiss, G.; Zivojinovic, I.; Sarkki, S.; Ravazzoli, E.; Dalla Torre, C.; Streifeneder, T.; Slee, W.; Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.; Barlagne C.; Prokofieva, I. (2017) Set of methods to assess SI implications at different levels: instructions for WPs 5 & 6., Deliverable 4.2, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp203.
  • Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M.; Barlagne, C. (2017) Minutes of 1st General Assembly., Deliverable 8.4, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp23.
  • Ludvig, A.; Weiss, G.; Zivojinovic, I.; Nijnik, M.; Miller, D.R.; Barlagne, C.; Perlik, M.; Hermann, P.; Egger, T.; Torre C.D.; Streifeneder, T.; Ravazzoli, E.; Sfeir, P.; Lukesch, R.; Wagner, K.; Egartner, S.; Clotteau, M. (2017) Political framework conditions, policies and instruments for SIs in rural areas., Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas, Deliverable 6.1, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp36.
  • Barlagne, C.; Bryce, R.; Valero, D.; Price, M.; Mosdale, L.; Clotteau, M.; Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M. (2017) Ethical approvals for research with human participants in the SIMRA Project, Deliverable 9.5., Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), Report to the European Commission, James Hutton Institute, pp.29.
  • Duckett, D.; Barlagne, C.; Kyle, C. (2017) Report of the workshop exploring the genetic diversity of potatoes for enhanced resilience of the potato sector., The James Hutton Institute, Report to Stakeholder Group, 5pp.
  • Barlagne, C.; Miller, D.R.; Nijnik, M. (2017) Ethical clearance procedures in SIMRA., Deliverable 1.5, Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (SIMRA), pp65.

Analysing how policy instruments shape soil, water and biodiversity (Project)

Our natural resources benefit society in many ways. Therefore, to achieve economic, social and environmental sustainability, management of natural resources must connect and consider multiple goals and issues.   However, ... Read more

Communities and Wellbeing: Local Assets, Local Decisions and Community Resilience (Project)

Who has commissioned this research and what will it deliver? ... Read more

PLAID Peer-to-peer Learning: Accessing Innovation through Demonstration (Project)

The PLAID project which launched in January 2017 is funded by the European Union under Horizon 2020. The project aims to increase the innovativeness and sustainability of European agriculture by enabling a wider range of farmers a ... Read more

SALSA – Small farms, small food businesses and sustainable food and nutrition security (Project)

SALSA will provide a better understanding of the current and potential contribution of small farms and food businesses to sustainable food and nutrition security. Using a food systems perspective the project will look beyond produ ... Read more

Behaviours in relation to rural diffuse pollution (Research Page)

Significant efforts and resources have been deployed to mitigate rural diffuse pollution through regulatory, guidance and voluntary measures. Despite these ongoing efforts, rural diffuse pollution remains a persisten problem. In S ... Read more

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Agricultural/Environmental Economist
laure.kuhfuss@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)1224 39 5404

The James Hutton Institute
Invergowrie
Dundee DD2 5DA
Scotland UK

 

Current research interests

General research questions:

  • Motivations and barriers to the adoption of pro-environmental practices by farmers
  • Design of Payments for Environmental Services (PES) schemes and agri-environmental policies
  • Lessons from behavioural sciences to improve agri-environmental policies
  • Spatial coordination issues in the uptake of pro-environmental practices
  • How to evaluate the effectiveness of agri-environmental schemes

This research relies on a variety of methodological tools such as:

  • Surveys (face to face, internet, focus groups)
  • Statistical / econometric analysis: discrete choice modelling, matching estimators
  • Valuation techniques, such as choice experiments and contingent valuation
  • Experimental economics

Laure’s main ongoing research projects:

  • Payments for Ecosystem Services: Lessons (PESLES): planning, developing and appraising implementation of measures and mechanisms to improve water quality and flow management (SG RESAS Programme RD1.2.4, 2016-2021)
  •  Effectiveness of Agri-Environmental and Climate Schemes in delivering multiple objectives at the landscape scale (SG RESAS Programme RD1.4.3, 2016-2021).
  • Spatial coordination and nudges in PES uptake: an experiment

Bibliography

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Research Assistant - Qualitative Methods
alba.juarezbourke@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Alba is a research assistant in qualitative methods working in the Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences research group at the James Hutton Institute.She completed a BSc in Environmental Sciences at the University of Valencia and an MSc in Social-Ecological Resilience for Sustainable Development at Stockholm Resilience Centre.

Current research interests

Identifying lessons for integrating delivery of water policy goals from international examples. This is funded by the Scottish Government RESAS Strategic Research Programme 2016-2021.

Exploring how policy instruments interact to shape the management of soil, water and biodiversity. This is funded by the Scottish Government RESAS Strategic Research Programme 2016-2021

Understanding of the role of habitats and biodiversity in the production of ecosystem services, and of the impact of management interventions on ecosystem service flows, within the Scottish Government funded RESAS Strategic Research Programme 2016-2021.

Exploring narratives that shape European environmental policies, within the project MAGIC 'Moving Towards Adaptive Governance in Complexity: Informing Nexus Security', funded by EU H2020.

Evaluating the impact of the Scottish Government funded Community Resilience Development Officer Post.

Past research

Alba’s past interest was in understanding the effect of stakeholder participation in natural resource management on outcomes in ecosystem and in learning processes. For her master’s thesis, Alba examined the involvement of stakeholders in the development of a land-use plan in Doñana, in Spain, through the lens of adaptive co-management.

Bibliography

  • Matthews, K.B.; Blackstock, K.L.; Waylen, K.A.; Rivington, M.; Miller, D.G.; Wardell-Johnson, D.; Juarez Bourke, A. (2019) Progress in second reporting period for the work package "Quality check for EU policy narratives" (WP5)., In: Giampietro, M. Technical Report for the Second Reporting Period of the H2020 Project MAGIC, (Submitted to the EC).
  • Matthews K.B.; Blackstock K.L.; Waylen K.A.; Juarez-Bourke A.; Miller, D.G.; Wardell-Johnson, D.H.; Rivington, M. (2018) Report on the quality check of the robustness of the narrative behind the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP)., MAGIC (H2020-GA 689669) Project Deliverable 5.5, 29 November 2018, 65pp.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Juarez-Bourke, A.; Tindale, S.; Maxwell, J.; Waylen, K.A. (2018) O1.4.2biD3: Aligning existing and new delivery mechanisms for multiple environmental benefits., Research Briefing on ‘New’ Instruments, James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, 44pp.
  • Waylen, K.A.; Tindale, S.; Juárez Bourke, A.; Blackstock, K.L. (2018) Insights from international experiences of integration for water management., Final Report, James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, September 2018, 27pp.
  • Eastwood, A.; Juarez Bourke, A.; Lorenzo-Arribas, A.; Fischer, A.; Herrett, S.; Donaldson-Selby, G.; Hague, A.; Pakeman, R.J.; Hester, A.J.; Artz, R.R.E. (2018) Glen Creran Woods: Exploring the perceived impacts of different management interventions on woodland benefits., Workshop Report, Appin Village Hall, Port Appin, Argyll, 23 April 2018, 18pp.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Juarez-Bourke, A.; Maxwell, J.; Tindale, S.; Waylen, K.A. (2018) Aligning policy instruments for biodiversity, soil and water., Report, James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, 24pp.
  • Matthews, K.B.; Blackstock, K.L.; Waylen, K.A.; Rivington, M.; Miller, D.G.; Wardell-Johnson, D.; Juarez Bourke, A. (2017) Progress in first reporting period for the work package "Quality check for EU policy narratives" (WP5)., In: Giampietro, M. Technical Report for the First Reporting Period of the H2020 Project MAGIC, (Submitted to the EC).
  • Matthews, K.B.; Blackstock, K.L.; Miller, D.G.; Rivington, M.; Waylen, K.A.; Juarez Bourke, A.; Wardell-Johnson, D.; Giampietro, M.; Cadillo, J.; Kovacic, Z.; Volker, T. (2017) The basis of EU farm competitiveness and its wider consequences, Definition of policy case study for: Common Agriculture Policy (CAP)., In: Matthews, K.B. (ed). Definition Policy Case Studies MAGIC (H2020-GA 689669) Project Milestone, 10 November 2017.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Novo, P.; Waylen, K.A.; Maxwell, J.; Juarez-Bourke, A. (2017) Coordinating policy instruments that influence soil, water, and biodiversity in Scotland: rationales, needs and challenges., Report from an ESCom (Ecosystem Service Community) Workshop, Edinburgh, 23 May 2017. Published as a Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences Group (SEGS) Blog on the James Hutton Institute server, 16 November 2017.

SIMRA workshop discusses how to shape social innovation for marginalised rural areas (News)

How can social innovation change the face of marginalised rural areas in Europe and beyond? What are the most appropriate approaches, methods and tools that can be used for assessing social innovations? What does policy support to ... Read more

Stochastic Anaerobic Digestion Economic Assessment Tool (Research Page)

What is anaerobic digestion? Anaerobic digestion is a process by which micro-organisms break down biodegradable material in the absence of oxygen, leading to the production of biogas and bio-fertilisers. Anaerobic digestion tech ... Read more

Exploring how to integrate goals for water management (Project)

There have been decades of calls for more integration in water and catchment management.  Many academic and policy documents state that improving integration should aid us in improving water management, particularly to effici ... Read more

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Creative methods social researcher
scott.herrett@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Scott is a social researcher using creative methods working in the Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences research group at the James Hutton Institute. Scott has a BSc. in Environmental studies from The Open University and an MSc. in Ecosystem Services from the University of Edinburgh.

Current research interests

Creative research methods, including digital storytelling and participatory video to understand competing knowledges to land and conservation.

Land reform, land use and community empowerment in Scotland

The human place in 'wildland'

Values in nature governance: Which values are being appealed to, which are not when it come to influencing and guiding behaivour?

Past research

Scott’s past interest resided in stakeholder participation in decisions relating to the natural environment and sustainability. Scott’s master’s dissertation explored the relationships between landowners, communities and landscape in the Scottish uplands using the lens of cultural ecosystem services.

Bibliography

Staff and Students (Research Page)

Since its formation, the group has been divided into three subgroups that are chiefly clustered around larger disciplinary perspectives – Values, Choices and Behaviour looking at individuals in their social context, Society, ... Read more

European sociologists meet in Aberdeen to discuss rural challenges (News)

How can people in rural areas thrive during times of rapid, transformational change? How can rural Europe cope with the many pressures arising from globalisation, migration, deregulation and the effects of neoliberal policies? Ove ... Read more

Mapping Rural Socio-Economic Performance (SEP) (Research Page)

This page presents the findings of a Scottish Government funded exercise by staff of the Social Economic and Geographical Sciences Group (SEGS) of the James Hutton Institute to develop a multivariate index of socio-economic perfor ... Read more

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
PhD Student
s.p.poskitt@pgr.reading.ac.uk

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Current research interests

Doctoral Research: Scenario planning, what is it good for? Investigating the benefits scenario planning may have for managing wicked problems.

Unsustainable relationships between humans and environments have led to significant problems that cross the boundaries between human and environmental systems. Such problems are characterised by multiple drivers that interact in complex ways and by uncertain pathways and conditions in the future. In the past two decades, scenario planning (the creation of multiple, plausible narratives that describe potential future conditions) has become an increasingly popular tool for helping manage such problems. However, it remains unclear exactly how and by what mechanisms scenario planning may help manage complex human and environmental problems. Sam’s PhD explores the use of participatory scenario planning as a tool for managing such complex and uncertain problems in human and environmental systems. Specifically, he explores learning in PSP, how learning occurs and what exactly is learned by whom in scenario planning processes.

Sam's PhD is supervised at the James Hutton Institute by Dr Kerry Waylen, and at the University of Reading by Dr Andrew Ainslie.

Past research

Sam's MRes research explored local people’s knowledge and perceptions of vulnerability to climate change in Sinazongwe, Zambia. He used a rudimentary scenario planning exercise as part of his methodology and developed a keen interest in it. However, the method was difficult for participants to understand and engage in, and failed to achieve the desired results. These difficulties subsequently attracted Sam to developing a more critical understanding of scenario planning through his PhD.

Sam also researched the emotional experience of driving for his undergraduate dissertation.

MAJI: More Action for Just Initiatives for Climate Change Adaptation in Southern Africa (Project)

The James Hutton Institute helps to support effective and equitable water management that will be sustainable in the long-term (and in the face of climate change), through its role in supporting a VSO-led project called “&qu ... Read more

Policy and Research Briefs (Research Page)

The briefs described on this page are either hosted on the knowledgescotland website, or are available for direct download (pdf format). ... Read more

MANECO (Project)

Managing ecosystem services in low alpine cultural landscapes through livestock grazing Current tree-lines in Norway are heavily depressed by land uses associated with traditional (agri-) cultural practices, but reduced intens ... Read more

RURALREIN (Project)

Reindeer herding and commodification of the outfields in Southern Sami areas- Challenges to established rights and practices (RURALREIN) ... Read more

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social Scientist
annabel.pinker@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0) 1224 395 442

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

I am a social anthropologist, with around 10 years of ethnographic research experience based on fieldwork in Ecuador, Peru and the UK. I am currently a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow (2015-18) in the Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences Group at the James Hutton Institute.

Current research interests

I am currently researching the social, material, and political processes implied by moves towards energy decentralisation and the promotion of greater local participation in renewable energy production in Scotland. My ethnographic work follows three wind energy projects at different scales where relations between humans, wind and technology are being actively (re)negotiated in a variety of experimental ways. One fieldwork site is an off-grid west coast peninsula whose electricity supply is gleaned in large part from handcrafted micro-wind turbines designed and deployed in situ; I am also tracking the process of obtaining, installing and integrating into the locality a community-owned wind turbine in north-east Scotland; finally, I am following the unfolding negotiations surrounding the establishment and implementation of a community benefit scheme associated with a windfarm that is set to be amongst Scotland's largest. The research will look at the emergent coalitions of power, technology, expertise and everyday life posed by these socio-technical projects, exploring what kinds of political spaces they open up, and how actors entailed in these projects - including local people, government representatives, planners, and energy consultants - negotiate existing regulatory frameworks in attempting to implement them. This research is supported by a Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship (2015-18), and is also linked to the EU-funded TESS (Towards European Societal Sustainability) project.

Past research

State Power, Decentralisation and Infrastructure in Highland Peru

I am continuing to develop research based on fieldwork I carried out in Peru (2011-2012), as part of the collaborative ethnographic project, ‘Experimental States: Law, Engineering and Regional Government in Cusco’, funded by the ACLS, AHRC, NSF and the Wenner-Gren Foundation. My fieldwork focused on the controversy surrounding plans to construct a road-bypass in the village of Ollantaytambo, near Cusco. This public infrastructure project emerged as a focal point for processes taking place across government scales, at local, provincial, regional, and national levels, enabling me to observe the multiple crisscrossing of competencies, norms, and political projects that are at play within decentralised spaces. In following the controversies that unfolded around the bypass, I explored our hypothesis that the regulatory ambiguities entailed in a multiple, distributed state became a site not only of confusion, but also of opportunity and experimental political practice

Missionary Practices and Social Change

I am completing a collaborative project concerning missionary practices and social change amongst the Achuar, based on recent fieldwork in the Ecuadorian Amazon. This project has been funded by Abya-Yala, Quito, and builds on my doctoral research (2005-10), which explored missionary practices, local cooperative development and state formation in the Ecuadorian Andes.

Bibliography

  • Pinker, A.; Harvey, P. (2017) Negotiating uncertainty: neoliberal statecraft in Peru., In: Laszczkowski, M. & Reeves, M. (eds.). Affective States: Entanglements, Suspensions, Suspicions. (Studies in Social Analysis), Berghahn, Oxford, Chapter 1, pp1-14.

Soils@Hutton - Soil Information and Education (Research Page)

Introduction to Soils Exploring Scotland's Soils ... Read more

TRANSGRASS: A transdisciplinary platform and toolkit for understanding and managing grasslands as socio-ecological systems (Project)

TRANSGRASS innovatively combined collaborative video, interactive Touchtable technology, and ecological surveys with a series of workshops to develop a transdisciplinary platform for the integration of contested for ... Read more

Learning Landscape Partnerships (Project)

Despite many decades of research within protected area landscapes, many protected area management organisations struggle to use scientific expertise in their management and decision making processes. The project has been funded by ... Read more

Exploring barriers to natural flood management (Project)

This project aims to provide a better understanding of barriers to the adoption and implementation of natural flood management (NFM) in Scotland.  ... Read more

Vibrant Rural Communities workshop (Research Page)

A workshop was held at Birnam Arts and Conference Centre on 20 November 2013 to provide an update on research being conducted as part of the Vibrant Rural Communities theme of the Food, Land and People Strategic Research programme ... Read more

Review of the economics of sustainable land management measures in drinking water catchments (Project)

Project aim The aim of this project was to review the economics of sustainable land management measures in catchments where abstraction for the provision of drinking water takes place. Funding was provided by CREW (Scotland&rsqu ... Read more

Piloting a Water Restoration Park in Scotland (Project)

The aim of this project was to support Scottish Water pilot a restoration park to reclaim waste water and market it to non-household water users. Funding was provided by CREW (Scotland’s Centre of Expertise for Waters) and t ... Read more

HUNTing for Sustainability (Project)

Project aim The overall goal of the project ‘Hunting for Sustainability’ was to assess the social, cultural, economic and ecological functions and impacts of hunting across a broad range of contexts in Europe and Afr ... Read more

Sustainable Estates for the 21st Century (Project)

The overall aim of the project was to align upland estate management in Scotland with the concept of sustainability. Funding was provided by the Henry Angest Foundation and it ran from 2007-2011.     Project Object ... Read more

Technology to support Older adults – Personal and Social interaction (TOPS) (Project)

The aim of this project was to develop technology to maximise personal and social interaction between older adults with chronic pain and their health and social care providers. Funding was provided by the Research Councils ... Read more

The contribution of green and open spaces in public health (Project)

Project aim The aim of this project was to explore the relationship between green space and human health using a range of methods and disciplinary approaches at different scales. It was funded by the Scottish Government and ran ... Read more

Developing a method to provide data on culverts for the Scottish Detailed River network initiative (Project)

The aim of this project was to assist in producing a Detailed River Network as required by the Flood Risk Management (Scotland) Act 2009. Funding was provided by CREW (Scotland’s Centre of Expertise for Waters) and it ran fr ... Read more

Towards European Societal Sustainability (TESS) (Project)

The aim of TESS is to investigate the role of community-based transition initiatives in fostering a more low-carbon and sustainable Europe. TESS is a European Union project funded under the Seventh Framework Pr ... Read more

Understanding and reducing rural-urban conflicts: governing outdoor access (Project)

Project aims This project looks at the management of conflicts: ... Read more

OrkCEmP - Orkney Community Empowerment Project (Project)

Project aim Orkney Community Empowerment Project (OrkCEmP) is part of the RESAS Theme 8 (Work Package 8.2) work on 'Governance and Decision-making for community empowerment in rural communities', running from 2011-2 ... Read more

Foodscapes (Project)

Project aim Foodscapes aims to explore how arts intervention and cultural engagement can help address social and economic exclusion, food poverty, and sustainability. It has been funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Counci ... Read more

FarmPath – Farming Transitions: Pathways towards regional sustainability of agriculture in Europe (Project)

The overall goal of FarmPath is to identify and assess future transition pathways towards regional sustainability of agriculture in Europe, and the social and technological innovation needs required to initiate and progress along ... Read more

Exploring the landscapes of governance for rural community empowerment in Aberdeenshire (Project)

Despite the emerging emphasis on the roles that (local) communities can play in public service reform and attempts to ‘empower’ communities (or allow them to ‘empower themselves’) in rural areas, the tensio ... Read more

Evaluating CREW (Project)

This project was commissioned by Scotland's Centre of Expertise for Waters (CREW) with the overall purpose of increasing the effectiveness of the centre’s work. CREW provided the funding for the project, which runs from ... Read more

Gender, green space and wellbeing (Project)

Project aim  This project aims to understand the relationship between gender, wellbeing and greenspace. It is funded through the Scottish Government and runs from 2011 until 2016. It is part of the RESAS Theme 8 WP8.3 work ... Read more

DICE – Developing an Interdisciplinary Culture of Excellence (Project)

Project aim The primary aim of the DICE project is to improve our understanding of interdisciplinary science within the James Hutton Institute and build capacity to undertake interdisciplinary research. It is funded through the ... Read more

Prospects for Farmers’ Support: Advisory Services in European AKIS (PRO AKIS) (Project)

In times of changing conditions, with strong pressure from markets and citizens to adjust and innovate, farmers need timely access to knowledge and information, to training and education, and to facilitating and supporting service ... Read more

Ecosystem Approach Review (Project)

Project aim This project explored existing examples of the Ecosystem Approach, to identify implications for future equitable and holistic natural resource management.  ... Read more

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Research Assistant
rachel.creaney@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

I am a research assistant with a background in social sciences and human geography. I obtained a joint undergraduate degree (MA Hons) in Anthropology and International Relations from the University of Aberdeen in 2011, and an MSc in Sustainable Rural Development, again from the University of Aberdeen, in 2013. I have a keen interest in travelling, taking time out before each degree to explore and work in different parts of the world.

Current research interests

I am currently providing assistance on PRO AKIS. PRO AKIS is an EU-funded research project which is investigating agricultural advisory services within the EU. I have also worked on the Farm Path project which aimed to identify and assess future transition pathways towards regional sustainability of agriculture in Europe. My work also reflects my interest in rural tourism and agritourism. Other areas of interest which I hope to develop further in the future are the sustainability of crofting and remote communities more generally, and the use of renewable energy within rural communities.

I have experience in qualitative methods, namely; interviews, documentary analysis, ethnographic work and participant observation, and use of NVivo. I also have some experience with quantitative methods such as survey work.

I have presented work at a series of seminars and conferences including a seminar on the sustainability of tourism on Eigg for SAMS (Scottish Association for Marine Science), the IFSA conference in Berlin and RGS-IBG in London in 2014. I have also presented work such as case study results at a number of PRO AKIS seminars.

I am a part of the local organising committee for the upcoming ESRS conference to be held in Aberdeen in August 2015 and a contributor to the SEGS blog.

 

Past research

As part of my MSc I was involved in a group research project on ecotourism in Kasanka National Park in Zambia. Other research included looking at the sustainability of crofting for remote communities in Scotland and the importance of traditional knowledge in environmental auditing. My MSc dissertation looked at the role of tourism as an aid to the sustainability for the residents of the Isle of Eigg (Scotland).

Bibliography

The LandscapePartners Project (Project)

This research project aimed to identify, analyse and assess the contribution of multi-stakeholder partnerships to the sustainable management of rural landscapes and to the well-being of communities in three European countries. In ... Read more

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Health/Wellbeing Social Scientist
margaret.currie@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Mags is a human geographer working in the health and wellbeing position in the Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences Group within the theme of society, institutions and governance. She joined the James Hutton Institute in January 2013.

Current research interests

Mags is interested in how different types of spaces affect health and wellbeing of people, more specifically how being in a space can affect peoples – both positively and negatively – and the ways in which interventions (policy or otherwise) can impact this. In short, Mags views herself as a human geographer, used to working as part of an interdisciplinary team and working to exchange knowledge with policy makers, public bodies and the third sector.

Mags is interested in:

(1) Innovative ways that services can be delivered in rural areas (e.g. social innovation, eHealth, flexible bus services etc)

(2) How processes of engagement, empowerment and reslience occur and change over time in different rural spaces and places

(3) Understaning peoples' motivations and barriers for using natural environments and how interactions with these spaces might differ for different people.

PhD Supervision
Gillian Dowds (University of Aberdeen) - due to submit September 2016

Andrew Maclaren (University of Aberdeen) due to submit September 2018

Rachel Creaney (University of St Andrews) due to submit September 2020

Ongoing and recent projects

  • SIMRA - Social Innovation in Marginalised Rural Areas (2016 - 2020) EU Horizon 2020 www.simra-h2020.eu
  • RELOCAL - Resituating the local in cohesion and territorial development (2016 - 2020) EU Horizon 2020.
  • Three projects through the Scottish Government's, RESAS Strategic Research Programme 2016-2021):
  • Local assets, local decisions and community resilience
  • Rural landscapes and community wellbeing
  • Place-based policy and its implications
  • Sustainable Rural Communities: Community Pilots (considering rural communities engagement around Private Water Supplies) (2015-2016) CREW - Centre for Expertise for Water.

Past research

  • Theme 8: Understanding the linkages and interdependencies between rural and urban areas (RESAS Strategic Research Programme 2011-2016)
  • WP8.3.1 Models and resource flows between rural and urban areas (RESAS Strategic Research Programme 2011-2016)
  • WP8.3.3 Understanding how urban and rural greenspace shapes wellbeing (RESAS Strategic Research Programme 2011-2016)
  • DICE – “Developing an Interdisciplinary Culture of Excellence” – James Hutton Institute Seedcorn funding
  • TOPS – Technologies to Support Older People at home: maximising personal and social interaction (through University of Aberdeen’s RCUK dot.rural research hub)
  • Evaluation of Community Nurse Consultant Role (QNIS)

Bibliography

  • Dowds, G.L.; Currie, M.; Philip, L.J.; Masthoff, J.F.M. (2018) A window to the outside world: digital technologies and new possibilities involving rural housebound older adults in local social activities., In: Curl, A. & Musslewhite, C. (eds.). Geographies of Transport and Ageing. Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan. Chapter 5, pp101-130.

Improving implementation and increasing uptake of measures to improve water quality in Scotland (Research Page)

Guidance and advice for improving implementation and increasing uptake of measures to improve water quality in Scotland The Scotland River Basin Management Plan (2010) requires implementation of programmes of measures to support ... Read more

Community-based Management of Environmental challenges in Latin America (Research Page)

COMET-LA was a project coordinated by the University of Cordoba and funded under the European Commission Framework Programme 7. The acronym stands for “COmmunity-based Management of EnvironmenTal challenges in Latin America& ... Read more

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social Researcher in Land Management
annie.mckee@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Current research interests

Annie's research interests include stakeholder and community engagement practices, rural governance and institutions, land management and land use policy, sustainable game management, the impact of land reform, rural community development and achieving sustainable development in rural areas. Annie has developed extensive knowledge and understanding of landownership and estate management systems through her PhD research (Thesis title: ‘The role of private landownership in contributing to sustainable rural communities in upland Scotland’), contributing to the ‘Sustainable Estates for the 21st Century’ project.

Annie also has significant experience of qualitative data collection and analysis, utilising methods such as ethnography, participant observation, semi-structured and autobiographical interviewing, and adopting action research and transdisciplinary approaches. She has developed proficient workshop facilitation skills through research roles in the HUNTing for Sustainability and FarmPath FP7 projects, amongst others, including contributing to the Scottish Government’s Strategic Research Programme (2011 – 2016 and 2016 – 2021 (ongoing)), under the themes of ‘rural economy adaptation to key external drivers’ (Work Package 2.4.2) and 'local assets, local decisions and community resilience' (Work Package 3.4.4).

On-going and recent projects

  • Project team contributing to the Scottish Government's 'Women in Farming and the Agricultural Sector' project (report due to be published in June 2017).
  • Project team contributing to the Centre of Expertise for Waters (CREW) project on community resilience to flood events.
  • Leading a Macaulay Development Trust project to facilitate a discussion on Scottish land reform.
  • Fellowship received from the OECD Co-operative Research Programme: Biological Resource Management for Sustainable Agricultural Systems in 2016, building links with the Centre for Rural Research, Trondheim, Norway.
  • Project team contributing to the Scottish Government’s Strategic Research Programme (2016 – 2021 ), under the themes of ‘rural economy adaptation to key external drivers’ (Work Package 2.4.2) and 'local assets, local decisions and community resilience' (Work Package 3.4.4); both projects funded under the Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services (RESAS) Division set up by the Scottish Government.

Past research

  • FarmPath, REFRESH, PROAKIS, and 'HUNTing for Sustainability' projects, funded under the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7).
  • Scottish Government-funded projects exploring the barriers to community land-based activities and how to overcome these barriers, as well as contributing to an exploration of the 'impact of diversity of ownership scale on social, economic and environmental outcomes'.
  • Theme 8, Work Package 8.2 "Governance and decision-making for community empowerment in rural communities" and Theme 3, Work Package 3.6 “Understanding land managers’ attitudes and behaviour towards the management of environmental assets and responding to climate change ", both projects funded under the Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services (RESAS) Division set up by the Scottish Government (Strategic Research Programme 2011-2016).
  • Undertaking social research within the Scottish Government’s Centre of Expertise for Livestock Disease Outbreaks (EPIC), in particular focussing on the impact of farmer behaviour on disease control and biosecurity.
  • Developing Learning Landscapes for Scotland’s Protected Areas - A European Perspective (funded by the Macaulay Development Trust).
  • How can we employ citizen science to determine the extent of soil erosion in Scotland? Report commissioned by SNIFFER (2014).
  • A methodology for assessing the public interest economic impacts of deer management. Report commissioned by SNH (2013).
  • ‘Sustainable Estates for the 21st Century’: The role of private landownership in facilitating sustainable rural communities in upland Scotland, funded by The Henry Angest Foundation (PhD awarded November 2013).
  • Sustainable Estates for the 21st Century: Knowledge Exchange Project, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, Scottish Government and Scottish Land & Estates (2011)

Bibliography

  • Pinto-Correia, T.; McKee, A.; Guimaraes, H. (2015) Transdisciplinarity in deriving sustainability pathways for agriculture., In: Sutherland, L-A., Darnhofer, I., Wilson G. A. & Zagata, L. (eds.). Transition Pathways towards Sustainability in Agriculture: Case Studies from Europe. CABI, Wallingford, Chapter 12, pp171-188.
  • McKee, A. (2013) The laird and the community., In: Glass, J., Price, M.F., Warren, C. & Scott, A. (eds.). Lairds, Land and Sustainability. Edinburgh University Press, Chapter 5.
  • McKee, A.; Warren, C.; Glass, J.; Wagstaff, P. (2013) Scottish private estate., In: Glass, J., Price, M.F., Warren, C. & Scott, A. (eds.). Lairds, Land and Sustainability: Scottish Perspectives on Upland Management. Edinburgh University Press, Chapter 3.
  • Glass, J.; McMorran, R.; Price, M.; McKee, A. (2012) Working together for sustainable estate communities: exploring the potential of collaborative initiatives between private estates, communities and other partners., Centre for Mountain Studies, Perth College, University of Highlands and Islands.

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Research Assistant in Environmental Governance
keith.marshall@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)1224 395406

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

I am a post-doctoral research assistant working in the Societies, Institutions and Governance sub-group of the Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences group here at the James Hutton Institute. I have a research and teaching background in resource management, conservation biology and habitat modelling for species conservation in the UK and overseas. I then moved, via studies on wildlife related human conflict, to researching issues around stakeholder attitudes, collaborative processes and governance structures in relation to natural resource management challenges.

 

Bibliography

  • MacMillan, D.C. and Marshall, K. (2004) Optimising capercailzie habitat in commercial forestry plantations., Forest Ecology and Management, 198, 351-365.
  • Welsh, D.; Scott, D.; Staines, B.; Stiolte, A.; Marshall, K. (1995) Monitoring the effects of fencing out red deer at Ballochbuie pinewood. Report for 1994 and 1995., Institute of Terrestrial Ecology Report, October 1995, 18pp.

  • Waylen, K.A.; Marshall, K.; Blackstock, K.L. (2019) Reviewing current understanding on catchment partnerships., Project Report by the James Hutton Institute.
  • Marshall, K. (2011) Stakeholder engagement in collaborative catchment management., Contract Report to University of Newcastle, 2 November 2011.
  • York, C.; Morris, T.; Marshall, K.; Cummins, R.P. (2010) Monitoring the impacts of recreational activities on the designated wildlife sites in and around Loch Lomond., Final Report to Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park Authority.

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Environmental Psychologist
tony.craig@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Tony Craig is an environmental psychologist working within the 'Values, Choices and Behaviour' subgroup of the Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences group. He carries out research in the topic area of people-environment studies.

Current research interests

Tony has a background in environmental psychology (MSc Surrey, 1998, PhD RGU, 2006), and has previously worked on a large number of research projects looking at people's attitudes to various issues, including sustainable wastewater management, prefabricated housing, sustainable housing, and public participation in urban design. Before working at the institute, Tony previously worked as a researcher in the school of architecture at the Robert Gordon University. His PhD (2006) was concerned with the relationship between sustainable design, environmental preferences, and environmentally friendly behaviour. During his previous job, Tony was a co-investigator on the ESRC funded Understanding Future Environments project, which used 3D computer representations of urban environments to compare the relative benefits of giving people the ability to actively navigate virtual environments (using computer games software), compared to passively observing VR presentations. He also carried out research looking at the concept of environmental familiarity, and the effect of familiarity on environmental preferences.

Between 2002 and 2006, he was on the board of the International Association of People Environment Studies (IAPS). He was voted back onto the board in 2012, and again in 2016. Tony was the treasurer of IAPS during the time that it was a UK registered charity.  He has also been the person responsible for the IAPS website, and is now the organisation secretary.

Between 2011 and 2015, Tony led a large study of energy consumption involving several hundred households in partnership with Aberdeenshire Council and Aberdeen City Council. This study (The 'North East Scotland Energy Monitoring Project') explored how effective  energy feedback (in the form of an in-home display) was in facilitating energy-reduction in households. The study involved a combined analysis of survey data with electricity-consumption data.. The large amount of data produced from this project is currently being prepare for archival in the UK data archive. A recent SEGS blog post by Tony explored some interesting insights that can be gleaned from such data in relation to waking times.

Tony has previously supervised 5 PhD students through to completion: Sander van der JagtCarlos Galan Diaz, and Leanne Townsend and Stephanie Graf. He is currently supervising 2 PhD students: Megan Watson and Lucy Sam. He also holds an honarary lecturer position at the Department of Psychology at the University of Aberdeen.

Tony is currently leading the James Hutton Institute's contribution to RD3.2.4 (Food Culture and Dietary Choice) within the RESAS 2016-2021 main research programme.  This is an interdisciplinary research programme using a systems approach to model influences on dietary choice, including comlex interacting individual and societal pressures, habits and cultures.  This work will involve the construction of an agent-based model (ABM) of food culture in relation to dietary choices.

Tony has previously worked on EU projects looking at energy behaviours (GILDED), and pro-environmental behaviours at work (LOCAW), and is currently working on a project examining sustainable lifestyles (GLAMURS).


Research Gate Profile: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Tony_Craig

Google Scholar Profile: http://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=wsz_07QAAAAJ&hl=en

ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9552-1682


Bibliography

  • Conniff, A.; Craig, T.; Laing, R.; Scott, S.; Galan-Diaz, C.R. (2007) Informing the practice of planning: researching future environments using desktop computers., In: Environmental Psychology: from research to 'real world' applications (eds. E. Edgerton and O. Romice). Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Newcastle, pp91-108.
  • Laing, R.; Conniff, A.; Craig, T.; Galan-Diaz, C.R.; Scott, S. (2007) Design and use of a virtual heritage model to enable a comparison of active navigation of buildings and spaces with passive observation., Automation in Construction, 16, 830-841.
  • Galan-Diaz, C.R.; Conniff, A.; Craig, T.; Laing, R.; Scott, S. (2006) Walking participants through a virtual model: How we got there and its implications., Cognitive Processing, 7, (supplement 1), s33-s36.
  • Edge, M.; Craig, T. (2005) Internet based methodologies in housing research., In: Methodologies in Housing Research (eds. N. Wilkinson and Y. Hurol). The Urban International Press, Gateshead, pp272-285.
  • Craig, T.; Abbott, L.; Laing, R.; Edge, M. (2005) Assessing the acceptability of alternative cladding materials in housing: theoretical and methodological challenges., In: Housing, Space and Quality of Life (eds. R. Garcia-Mira, D. Uzzell, J. Real and J. Romay). Ashgate, Aldershot, pp59-69.
  • Craig, T. (2002) Overcoming expertocracy through sustainable development : the case of wastewater., In: People, Places and Sustainability (eds. G. Moser, E. Pol, Y. Bernard, M. Bonnes, J. Corraliza and V. Giuliani). Hogrefe and Huber, Gottingen, Germany, pp270-279.
  • Burkhard, R., Deletic, A. and Craig, T. (2000) Techniques for water and wastewater management: A review of techniques and their integration in planning., Urban Water, 2, 197-221.

  • Polhill, J.G.; Craig, T.; Alonso-Betanzos, A.; Sanchez-Marono, N.; Fontenla-Romero, O.; Dumitru, A.; Garcia-Mira, R.; Bonnes, M.; Bonaiuto, M.; Carrus, G.; Marricchiolo, F.; Fornara, F.; Ilin, C.; Steg, L.; Ruepert, A.; Keizer, K. (2017) Interactions matter. Modelling everyday pro-environmental norm transmission and diffusion in workplace networks., In: Alonso-Betanzos, A., Sánchez-Maroño, N., Fontenla-Romero, O., Polhill, J.G., Craig, T., Bajo, J. & Corchado, J.M. (eds.) Agent-Based Modeling of Sustainable Behaviors. Springer, Cham, Switzerland, Chapter 2, pp27-52.
  • Sanchez-Maronon, N.; Alonso-Betanzos, A.; Fontenla-Romero, O.; Polhill, J.G.; Craig, T. (2017) Empirically-deprived behavioural rules in agent-based models using decision trees learned from questionnaire data., In: Alonso-Betanzos, A., Sanchez-Marono, N., Fontenla-Romera, O., Polhill, J.G., Craig, T., Bajo, J. & Corchado, M. (eds.). Agent Based Modelling of Sustainable Behaviors. Springer, Switzerland, Chapter 3, pp53-76.
  • Sanchez-Maronon, N.; Alonso-Betanzos, A.; Fontenla-Romero, O.; Polhill, J.G.; Craig, T. (2015) Designing decision trees for representing sustainable behaviours in agents., In: Bajo, J., Hernandez, J.Z., Mathieu, P., Campbell, A., FernandezCaballero, A., Moreno, M.N., Julian, V., AlonsoBetanzos, A., JimenezLopez, M.D. & Botti, V. (eds.). Trends in Practical Applications of Agents, Multi-Agent Systems and Sustainability: The PAAMS Collection, Advances in Intelligent Systems and Sustainability, Springer, Berlin, Volume 372, 169-176.
  • Galan-Diaz, C.; Conniff, A.; Craig, T. (2014) Using Nvivo for handling large data sets: a case study., In: Paulus, T., Lester, J. & Dempster, P. (eds.). Digital Tools for Qualitative Research. Sage, London, pp121-122.

  • Salt, D.; Polhill, J.G.; Craig, T. (2016) Deliverable 2.2: Report on the ontology generation and data and knowledge integration., Green Lifestyles Alternative Models and Up-scaling Regional Sustainability / GLAMURS EU SSH.2013.2.1-1 Grant Agreement No. 613420.
  • Salt, D.; Polhill, J.G.; Craig, T. (2016) Deliverable 2., Report for Glamurs Ontology Project.
  • Polhill, J.G.; Craig, T.; Ge, J.; Lorenzo-Arribas, A. (2016) Out-of-range wattage in CurrentCost energy monitor readings., Short Report to CurrentCost.
  • Gilchrist, K.; Craig, T. (2014) Home energy efficiency - a review of evidence of attitudes and behaviours., ClimateXChange website.
  • Rivington, M.; Dinnie, E.; Craig, T.; Heslop, S.; Slee, B.; Matthews, R.; Nijnik, M.; Morris, S.; Stewart, D.; Martin-Ortega, J.; Dawson, L.A.; Daniell, T. (2013) Climate: public understanding and policy implications., The James Hutton Institute response to the UK Parliament House of Commons Select Committee Inquiry, April 2013.
  • Craig, T. (2012) Response to the DECC Consultation on the consumer engagement strategy supporting the smart meter rollout., DECC Consultation (URN 12D/033).
  • Sutherland, L.A.; Fischer, A.; Craig, T.; Gotts, N.M. (2009) GILDED European Policy Brief One., Deliverable from GILDED FP7 Project for European Commission.

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Qualitatitve Social Scientist
kirsty.blackstock@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Current research interests

My research focuses on governance, particularly public and stakeholder participation in environmental policy making and implementation. I have an associated interest in the use of 'tools' as deliberative boundary objects in decision making and evaluation processes. I generally favour mixed qualitative methods such as interviews, focus groups and participant observation. Threading through my research is an interest in reconciling critical approaches to policy making and implementation with constructive engagement in knowledge exchange with policy actors. This reflects my interest in ‘studying up’ – using the politics and practices of participatory research to work with people in positions of power and authority.  Currently, I am considering how systemic approaches co-exist with, conflict with or shape existing policies shaping Scottish land and water management, and moving into the study of reconciling living within planetary boundaries with social, environmental and geographical justice.

 

Ongoing projects

  • I am part of the Hutton team contributing to the H2020 project “Moving Towards Adaptive Governance in Complexity: Informing Nexus Security” (MAGIC - see also here) led by Mario Giampietro at Autonomous University of Barcelona (2016-2020).  My focus is to work on the 'semantic' phase of the quantitative story telling cycle - elicting and analysing narratives about the Common Agricultural Policy and its interaction with the Water-Energy-Food Nexus, Climate Change and Sustainable Develoment Goals; and discussing with EU stakeholders whether the outcomes of the social metabolism accounting are feasible, viable and/or desirable.
  • I coordinated the Scottish Government Strategic Research Programme WP1.4 on “Integrated and Sustainable Management of Natural Assets“ from April 2016 to April 2018. I contribute to several aspects of the research, including supporting our consideration of how adaptive management is practiced in Scotland (WP1.4.3) and participating in the Scottish Forum for Natural Capital's working group on Future Land Manager Business Models. My substantive contributions are focussed on how policy implementation can better support the delivery of multiple benefits and protect our natural assets. The focus is on the coordination or integration of policy instruments and the role of monitoring in developing a more systemic approach to management.
  • I work closely with two Macaulay Development Trust Fellows - Jessica Maxwell with reference to linking planning to ecosystem services; and Paola Ovando-Pol with reference to Natural Capital. I also supervise a Macaulay Development Trust funded PhD studentship on Natural Capital Accounting: Distribution of Benefits. Oliver Zwiner is co-supervised by myself and Julia Martin-Ortega (University of Leeds).
  • Past Projects

Bibliography

  • Sherlock, K.L. (2002) Community matters: Reflections from the field., Sociological Research Online, 7(2).
  • Sherlock, K.L. (2001) Revisiting the concept of hosts and guests., Tourist Studies, 1, 271- 295

  • Blackstock, K.L. (2017) Participation in the context of ecological economics., In: Spash, C.L. (ed.). Routledge Handbook of Ecological Economics: Nature and Society. Routledge, Abingdon, Oxon, Chapter 33, pp341-350.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Waylen, K.A. (2016) Delivering ecosystem services at a national scale: institutions and governance., In: Brooker, R., Hester, A. & Pakeman, R. (eds.). Ecosystem Services. The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, pp18-19.
  • Eastwood, A.; Irvine, J.; Blackstock, K.; Byg, A.; Fischer, A. (2016) Approaches for more integrated and participatory decision making., In: Brooker, R., Hester, A. & Pakeman, R. (eds.). Ecosystem Services. The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, pp14-15.
  • Waylen, K.A.; Blackstock, K.L. (2016) Concepts: 'Eco' terminology., In: Brooker, R., Hester, A. & Pakeman, R. (eds.). Ecosystem Services. The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, pp4-5.
  • Waylen, K.A.; Gearey, B.R.; Blackstock, K.L. (2016) Peatlands and cultural ecosystem services., In: Bonn, A., Allott, T., Evans, M., Joosten, H. & Stoneman, R. (eds.). Peatland Restoration for Ecosystem Services. Ecological Reviews Series, British Ecological Society, Cambridge University Press, Chapter 7, pp114-128.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Martin-Ortega, J.; Spray C.J. (2015) Implementation of the European Water Framework Directive: What does taking an ecosystem services-based approach add?, In: Martin-Ortega, J., Ferrier, R.C., Gordon, I.J. & Khan, S. (eds.). Water Ecosystem Services: A Global Perspective. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp57-64.
  • Church, A.; Burgess, J.; Ravenscroft, N.; Bird, W.; Blackstock, K.L.; Brady, E.; Crang, M.; Fish, R.; Gruffud, P.; Mourato, S.; Pretty, J.; Tolia-Kerry, D.; Turner, K.; Winter, M. (2011) Cultural services., In: UK National Ecosystem Assessment. Understanding Nature's Value to Society. Technical Report. Cambridge, UNEP-WCMC, Chapter 16, pp631-691.
  • van der Wal, R.; Bonn, A.; Monteith, D.; Reed, M.; Blackstock, K.L.; Hanley, N.; Thompson, D.; Evans, M.; Alonso, I.; Allott, T.; Armitage, H.; Beharry, N.; Glass, J.; Johnson, S.; McMorrow, J.; Ross, L.; Pakeman, R.J.; Perry, S.; Tinch, D. (2011) Mountains, moorlands and heaths., In: UK National Ecosystem Assessment. Understanding Nature's Value to Society. Technical Report. Cambridge, UNEP-WCMC, Chapter 5, pp106-159.
  • Ferrier, R.C.; Jenkins, A.; Blackstock, K.L. (2010) The future for catchment management., In: Ferrier, R.C. & Jenkins, A. (eds.). Handbook of Catchment Management. Blackwell Publications, Oxford, pp501-515.
  • Aslin, H.; Blackstock, K.L. (2010) Now I'm not an in expert in anything: challenges in undertaking transdisciplinary inquiries across the social and biophysical sciences., In: Brown, V.A., Harris, J.A. & Russell, J.Y. (eds.). Tackling Wicked Problems: Through the Transdisciplinary Imagination. Earthscan, London, Chapter 7a, pp117-129. ISBN 9781844079254
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Cooksley, S.L.; Langan, S.J.; Marshall, K.B.; Coull, M.C. (2009) CATCH: Integrated catchment planning: a handbook for project officers., Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, Aberdeen, 97p.
  • Blackstock K.L.; Richards C. (2008) Active involvement in river basin planning: lessons learnt from the River Spey, Scotland., In: Sustainability in River Basins: A Question of Governance (eds. A. Dehnhardt and U. Petschow). Oekom, Munich, pp269-292. ISBN: 978-3-865810342
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Brown, K.M.; Davies, B.B.; Shannon, P. (2006) Individualism, cooperation and conservation in Scottish farming communities., Rural Governance: International Perspectives (eds. L. Cheshire, V. Higgins and G. Lawrence). Routledge Studies in Human Geography, Routledge, UK. ISBN: 978-0-415-39959-3
  • Innes, A.; Sherlock, K.L. (2004) Rural communities., In: Dementia and Social Inclusion: Marginalised Groups and Marginalised Areas of Dementia Research, Care and Practice, (eds. A. Innes, C. Archibald and C. Murphy). Jessica Kingsley Publishers, London. ISBN: 1843101742

  • Waylen, K.A.; Marshall, K.; Blackstock, K.L. (2019) Reviewing current understanding on catchment partnerships., Project Report by the James Hutton Institute.
  • Matthews, K.B.; Blackstock, K.L.; Waylen, K.A.; Rivington, M.; Miller, D.G.; Wardell-Johnson, D.; Juarez Bourke, A. (2019) Progress in second reporting period for the work package "Quality check for EU policy narratives" (WP5)., In: Giampietro, M. Technical Report for the Second Reporting Period of the H2020 Project MAGIC, (Submitted to the EC).
  • Matthews K.B.; Blackstock K.L.; Waylen K.A.; Juarez-Bourke A.; Miller, D.G.; Wardell-Johnson, D.H.; Rivington, M. (2018) Report on the quality check of the robustness of the narrative behind the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP)., MAGIC (H2020-GA 689669) Project Deliverable 5.5, 29 November 2018, 65pp.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Juarez-Bourke, A.; Tindale, S.; Maxwell, J.; Waylen, K.A. (2018) O1.4.2biD3: Aligning existing and new delivery mechanisms for multiple environmental benefits., Research Briefing on ‘New’ Instruments, James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, 44pp.
  • Waylen, K.A.; Tindale, S.; Juárez Bourke, A.; Blackstock, K.L. (2018) Insights from international experiences of integration for water management., Final Report, James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, September 2018, 27pp.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Juarez-Bourke, A.; Maxwell, J.; Tindale, S.; Waylen, K.A. (2018) Aligning policy instruments for biodiversity, soil and water., Report, James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, 24pp.
  • Ring, I.; Sandström, C.; Acar, S.; Adeishvili, M.; Albert, C.; Allard, C.; Anker, Y.; Arlettaz, R.; Bela, G.; ten Brink, B.; Coscieme, L.; Fischer, A.; Fürst, C.; Galil, B.; Hynes, S.; Kasymov, U.; Marta-Pedroso, C.; Mendes, A.; Molau, U.; Olschewski, R.; Pergl, J.; Simoncini, R.; Blackstock, K.L. (2018) Communication, capacity building and public participation., In: Rounsevell, M., Fischer, M., Torre-Marin Rando, A. & Mader, A. (eds.). IPBES (2018): The IPBES Regional Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services for Europe and Central Asia. Secretariat of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, Bonn, Germany, Chapter 6, Section 6.6.3.3., pp1041-1043.
  • Ring, I.; Sandström, C.; Acar, S.; Adeishvili, M.; Albert, C.; Allard, C.; Anker, Y.; Arlettaz, R.; Bela, G.; ten Brink, B.; Coscieme, L.; Fischer, A.; Fürst, C.; Galil, B.; Hynes, S.; Kasymov, U.; Marta-Pedroso, C.; Mendes, A.; Molau, U.; Olschewski, R.; Pergl, J.; Simoncini, R.; Blackstock, K.L. (2018) Environmental governance for biodiversity and nature's contributions to people: synergies and trade-offs: Chapter 6, Section 6.4.2. Options for governance and decision making across scales and sectors ., In: Rounsevell, M., Fischer, M., Torre-Marin Rando, A. & Mader, A. (eds.). IPBES (2018): The IPBES Regional Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services for Europe and Central Asia. Secretariat of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, Bonn, Germany, Chapter 6, Section 6.4.2., pp980- 988.
  • Matthews, K.B.; Blackstock, K.L.; Waylen, K.A.; Rivington, M.; Miller, D.G.; Wardell-Johnson, D.; Juarez Bourke, A. (2017) Progress in first reporting period for the work package "Quality check for EU policy narratives" (WP5)., In: Giampietro, M. Technical Report for the First Reporting Period of the H2020 Project MAGIC, (Submitted to the EC).
  • Matthews, K.B.; Blackstock, K.L.; Miller, D.G.; Rivington, M.; Waylen, K.A.; Juarez Bourke, A.; Wardell-Johnson, D.; Giampietro, M.; Cadillo, J.; Kovacic, Z.; Volker, T. (2017) The basis of EU farm competitiveness and its wider consequences, Definition of policy case study for: Common Agriculture Policy (CAP)., In: Matthews, K.B. (ed). Definition Policy Case Studies MAGIC (H2020-GA 689669) Project Milestone, 10 November 2017.
  • Faccioli, M.; Blackstock, K.L. (2017) Review of UK natural capital initiatives., James Hutton Institute, 22pp.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Novo, P.; Waylen, K.A.; Maxwell, J.; Juarez-Bourke, A. (2017) Coordinating policy instruments that influence soil, water, and biodiversity in Scotland: rationales, needs and challenges., Report from an ESCom (Ecosystem Service Community) Workshop, Edinburgh, 23 May 2017. Published as a Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences Group (SEGS) Blog on the James Hutton Institute server, 16 November 2017.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Christie, M.; Elm, M.; Faccioli, M.; Herrett, S. (2017) Understanding and using the concept of natural capital in Scottish public sector organisations., Briefing for the Round Table on Natural Capital, Edinburgh, 23 November 2017.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Brooker, R.; Pakeman, R.J.; Ellis, C.; George, T.; Iason, G.; Gilbert, L.; Artz, R,.R.E.; Irvine, R.J.; McVittie, A.; Newey, S.; Mitchell, R.; Gimona, A.; Fischer, A.; Begg, G.; Maxwell, J. (2017) Ecosystems and Land Use Stakeholders Engagement Group (ELSEG) Workshop Report., Workshop, Victoria Quay, Edinburgh, 20 November 2017.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Van Hulst, F.; MacLeod, C.J.A.; Waylen, K.A. (2017) Monitoring and Evaluation for Ecosystem Management (MEEM) - Comparing theory and documented practice across Europe., Technical Report for Project, November 2017, 96pp.
  • Macleod, C.J.A.; Blackstock, K.L.; Brown, A.; Eastwood, A.; Fisher, A.; Gimona, A.; Prager, K.; Irvine, R.J. (2017) Adaptive management evaluation framework., RESAS1.4.3a Deliverable M2.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Dick, J. (2017) What has the concept of Natural Capital got to do with you?, ESCOM News, 29 January 2017. (Report on Workshop).
  • Blackstock, K.L.; McVittie, A.; Gimona, A.; Irvine, R.J. (2017) WP1.4 meeting report: progress to date and looking forward. RESAS1.4 additional deliverable in lieu of quarterly Work Package Management Group Meeting., Internal Workshop Report circulated to all MRP researchers involved in WP1.4.
  • MacLeod, C.J.; Blackstock, K.L.; Brown, K.M.; Eastwood, A.; Gimona, A.; Prager, K.; Irvine, R.J. (2016) Adaptive management: an overview of the concept and its practical application in the Scottish context., Technical Report for RESAS1.4.3a Deliverable D1, 24pp.
  • Faccioli, M.; McVittie, A.; Glenk, K.; Blackstock, K.L. (2016) Natural Capital Accounts: Review of available data and accounting options., Technical report - to be published on WP 1.4. website once developed.

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social Researcher
kerry.waylen@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)1224 395313

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Current research interests

Kerry's main ongoing research projects

Her research is motivated by the following research questions:

  • When might it make sense to adopt new concepts and instruments for environmental management? How can we best understand the challenges and consequences of implementing such new concepts, especially those (such as the 'Ecosystem Approach') that encourage a systemic approach to connect multiple issues?
  • How are different knowledges produced and used in collaboration and decision-making for environmental management? If and how do concepts (such as ecosystem services) or tools (such as scenario-planning) influence processes of knowledge co-production, including in science-policy interfaces?
  • How can we better enable stakeholder participation in environmental management, including Community-Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) ?  What are the social and environmental consequences of doing so?

Kerry's expertise includes the following skills for carrying out, managing and communicating research:

  • Qualitative research methods e.g. semi-structured interviews, participant observation, Rapid Rural Appraisal, qualitative thematic analysis using both inductive and deductive approaches.
  • Quantitative research methods e.g. design, deployment and quantiative analysis of paper and online surveys for primary data collection, design and deplyment of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to identify and analyse secondary data
  • Design and facilitation of workshops for knowledge exchange and/or data collection.
  • Engaging and communicating with varied audiences using varied methods, from short written briefings, longer reports and academic papers, through to videos, oral presentations and blog posts.
  • Research project management, line management, student supervision, data management and research ethics.

Kerry currently co-supervises 1 PhD student: Kirsty Holstead, who is building understanding of community water governance, funded by a Hydronation scholarship, with Dr Shona Russell at the University of St Andrews. She previously co-supervised Sam Poskitt, who is exploring the potential of scenario-planning to support learning for sustainable development, joint funded by ESRC and the James Hutton Institute, with Dr Andrew Ainslie at the University of Reading. Sam obtained his PhD in March 2018 and now works at the University of Reading on the participatory extension work in developing countries.

Kerry is a trustee of the Orskov Foundation, a charitable foundation that supports students and communities to develop sustainable land use to support livelihoods in lower-income countries. She is also a research associate of CECHR, the Centre for Environmental Change and Human Resilience at Dundee.   Within the Institute, Kerry is leader of the 'Society Institutions and Governance' sub-group of SEGS, and she also founded the SEGS blog.

Past research

She jointly led research with Kirsty Blackstock to understand the potential and challanges of implementing the Ecosystem Approach, funded by the Scottish Government RESAS Strategic Research Programme 2011-2016. Click here to visit the webpage of the Ecosystem Approach Review. This and several other projects have explored multi-level constraints on adopting more systemic and/or participatory approaches to environmental management, including: exploration of the barriers to implementing natural flood management in Scotland; analysing the first round of River Basin Management Planning for implementation of the Water Framework Directive in Scotland; and appraising the factors that can act as barriers to improving water quality.

She has explored the potential of scenario-planning to support natural resource management: she first explored scenarios of future change environmental, social and policy change for FP7-project REFRESH, then for COMET-LA (an EU FP7 project on Community-based Management of Environmental Challenges in Latin America) she explored if and how scenario-planning can assist communities to identify and develop sustainable community-based management. From 2012-16 Kerry used this knowledge to support Malawian villages and district-level planning for integrated natural resource management in two projects called "Water Futures: Towards Equitable Resource Strategies" aimed to improve the resilience of Malawi'sn water management, whilst successor project 'MAJI' focused on how to take account of climate change.

Kerry also has expertise on knowledge co-production processes relating to environmental management: she co-led WP2 for the FP7 project ‘SPIRAL’ (Science Policy Interfaces for Research Action and Learning, for biodiversity). She has used this expertise to help support practical science-policy connections in later projects such as MAGIC. For example, she helped designed the ESPPI:CREW project to evaluate science-policy and practice links for the Scottish Centre of Expertise in Waters and was involved in CATCH II, an initiative which aimed to try to better connect policy, practitioners working in and for integrated catchment management.

Prior to working at the James Hutton Institute Kerry's PhD research, carried out at Imperial College London 2006-2009, examined how combinations of individual views, culture and local institutions could influence the outcomes of community-based conservation in developing countries. In addition to policy-relevant work with NGOs, her prior experience included social research into attitudes towards nature resources in Trinidad, as part of an MSc from Imperial College. Her first degree is a MA in Natural Sciences, from Cambridge University.

Bibliography

  • Young, J.; Waylen, K.A.; van den Hove, S.; Watt, A. (2016) SPIRAL Improving science-policy interfaces for biodiversity., In: Martinuzzi, A. & Sedlacko, M. (eds.). Knowledge Brokerage for Sustainable Development. Innovative Tools for Increasing Research Impact and Evidence-Based Policy-Making. Greenleaf Publishing, Saltaire, UK, pp275-290.
  • Blackstock, K.L.; Waylen, K.A. (2016) Delivering ecosystem services at a national scale: institutions and governance., In: Brooker, R., Hester, A. & Pakeman, R. (eds.). Ecosystem Services. The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, pp18-19.
  • Waylen, K.A.; Blackstock, K.L. (2016) Concepts: 'Eco' terminology., In: Brooker, R., Hester, A. & Pakeman, R. (eds.). Ecosystem Services. The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, pp4-5.
  • Waylen, K.A.; Gearey, B.R.; Blackstock, K.L. (2016) Peatlands and cultural ecosystem services., In: Bonn, A., Allott, T., Evans, M., Joosten, H. & Stoneman, R. (eds.). Peatland Restoration for Ecosystem Services. Ecological Reviews Series, British Ecological Society, Cambridge University Press, Chapter 7, pp114-128.

Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Researcher in Agri-Environmental Approaches
sharon.flanigan@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)1224 395301

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

I am a qualitative social scientist with a background in rural topics, primarily focussing on aspects of agriculture, tourism, and networking in rural areas. I completed my PhD ‘Developing and applying a framework for agritourism’ at The Macaulay Institute and University of Aberdeen in 2011.

Current research interests

Demonstration activities on commercial farms

Investigation of on-farm demonstration activities through case studies across Europe to look at governance, motivations, practices and application of lessons learned at individual and community levels. This research is being undertaken as part of EU H2020 PLAID (Peer-to-peer Learning: Accessing Innovation through Demonstration) (2017-2019) and RESAS agricultural systems and land management theme (2016-2021).

New entrants to farming

Developing a network to support new entrants to agriculture and identification and dissemination of new business and entry models and innovation in the sector. This work is being conducted under EU H2020 Newbie (New Entrant network: Business models for Innovation, entrepreneurship and resilience in European agriculture) (2018-2021).

Landscape-scale agri-environmental approaches

Investigation of agri-environmental approaches from a social perspective to explore how they may be applied to achieve multiple benefits and protect natural assets. This work is being conducted as part of RESAS integrated and sustainable management of natural assets theme (2016-2021).

Past research

Collaboration in machinery rings

This project explored machinery rings as a form of agricultural cooperative, which have emerged and evolved into large collaborative institutions since they were introduced in Scotland in the late 1980s. This formed part of a wider investigation of transitions in agriculture being undertaken in the EU FP7 FarmPath (Farming Transitions: Pathways towards regional sustainability of agriculture in Europe) project (2011-2014) and RESAS Environmental Change: Land Use research theme (2011-2016).

Developing social capital and reciprocity in agritourism communities

This project explored various aspects of social capital development and capital conversion towards understanding the role of social learning groups in supporting small businesses and the people behind them. This formed part of the RESAS Environmental Change: Economic Adaptation research theme (2011-2016).

Developing and applying a framework for agritourism

My PhD project first sought to enhance conceptual understanding of agritourism through development of a theoretical typology, which I then applied in Scotland to explore what drives different types of agritourism and how that can help to understand the public and private benefits generated. This project was funded by The Macaulay Development Trust (2008-2011).

Exploring economic and legislative aspects of deer management

This project included investigation of collaborative practices, venison production, and legislation to better understand the drivers and barriers affecting deer management in the UK. This research was undertaken as part of the RELU Collaborative frameworks in land management project (2006-2009).

Bibliography

  • Flanigan, S.; Matthews, K.B. (2013) Planning to succeed agritourism (2011-2014). Mid-programme evaluation., Report to Scottish Enterprise, June 2013.
  • Matthews, K.B.; Artz, R.R.E.; Birch, A.N.E.; Blackstock, K.L.; Brooker, R.; Brown, I.; Cummins, R.; Flanigan, S.; Hallet, P.; Irvine, R.J.; Kenyon, W.; Pakeman, R.J., Prager, K.; Slee, B.; Squire, G.; Stutter, M.; Sutherland, L.; Thomson, K.; Towers, W.; Vinten, A.J.A. (2012) Developing agri-environmental measures for the next Scottish Rural Development Programme: a summary of relevant research findings from the James Hutton Institute., Report to the Scottish Government, Natural Resources Division, SRDP Technical Working Group (Agri-Environment), 11pp, 25 June 2012.
  • Flanigan, S.; Holstead, K.L. (2012) Results of focus group discussions to explore members' perceptions of machinery rings in relation to change, collaboration and sustainability., Report to Borders Machinery Ring (BMR): Summary of findings for machinery ring stakeholders.
  • Flanigan, S.; Holstead, K.L. (2012) Results of focus group discussions to explore members' perceptions of machinery rings in relation to change, collaboration and sustainability, Report to Ringlink: Summary of findings for machinery ring stakeholders.
  • Flanigan, S. (2012) Planning to succeed agritourism: Participants circumstances and expectations in year 1., Report to Scottish Enterprise, The Collection Limited and Planning to Succeed Group.

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The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.