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Balrownie

Distribution of Balrownie Soil Association DERIVATION:

Old Red Sandstone rocks, principally sandstone with some erratics of Dalradian schist

TYPES OF PARENT MATERIALS MAPPED:

  • Glacial till, generally water-modified
  • Glacial drift, generally water-modified or onto rock
  • Shattered rock in situ
  • Deeply weathered rock

COLOUR:

Distinctive reddish brown colour within subsoil

TEXTURE:

Sandy loam water-modified material within the upper 60cms overlying sandy silt loam or clay loam at greater depth. Slightly to moderate stony.

DOMINANT LAND USE:

Arable, some forestry and limited recreation.

LANDFORMS

Undulating lowland and foothills with gentle or moderate slopes, all landforms generally free from rock outcrop.

SOIL CHEMISTRY:

Moderately acidic with low or medium percentage base saturation in subsoil but high in fine-textured parent material. Low total phosphorus in subsoil.

SOIL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES:

  • 35-60cm depending on thickness of water-modified material or presence of rock.
  • Till compact at depth and lacks structure.
SERIES NAME SOIL TYPE DRAINAGE PARENT MATERIAL
Aldbar Podzol and humus iron podzol Free Till
Balrownie Brown forest soil with gleying Imperfect Till often water-modified
Balrowskel Skeletal soi Variable Very shallow drift
Buchanyhill Brown forest soil Free Deeply weathered rock and till onto rock
Dunblane Brown forest soil Free Till
Findowrie Peaty gley (SW) Very poor Till often water-modified
Hayston Humus iron podzol Free Weathering sandstone
Kippendavie Brown forest soil with gleying Imperfect Till
Liff Brown forest soil with gleying Imperfect Colluvium
Lour Noncalcareous gley Poor Till often water-modified
Muirhead Podzol and humus iron podzol Imperfect Till
Reedie Brown forest soil Free Till often water-modified
Sheriffmuir Peaty gley (SW) Poor and very poor Till
Shindour Peaty podzol Free Till
Tullibardine Peaty podzol Imperfect Till

 

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Printed from /learning/exploringscotland/soils/series/balrownie on 17/08/18 02:12:09 AM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.