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Agent-based model (c) James Hutton Institute
Thursday, August 16, 2018

Corporate culture can impact the benefits of workplace sharing

Researchers from the James Hutton Institute have discovered the apparent benefits of workplace sharing with regards to reducing commuting times and CO2 emissions can be negated by corporate culture and organisational structure.

Monitoring temperature of Spey river waters (c) Paul Glendell
Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Scottish rivers are warming, Hutton research shows

By comparing historical records kept by the Tulchan Estate with hydroclimatic datasets, Hutton scientists have been able to spot an increase in the water temperature of the river Spey over the last 105 years, which may have consequences for rural economies.

Germinate 3 screenshot (c) James Hutton Institute
Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Crop Wild Relatives pre-breeding data available on Germinate 3

Germinate 3, the Institute's plant genetic resources database, will enable breeders and scientists to access huge amounts of data generated by the Crop Trust-led Crop Wild Relatives project.

Dr Mark Taylor speaks to journalists during Potatoes in Practice 2018 (c) Hutton
Friday, August 10, 2018

Climate-resilient spuds in focus at Potatoes in Practice 2018

At Potatoes in Practice 2018, scientists of the James Hutton Institute discussed research to help develop potato varieties resilient to heat stress and suited to the requirements of growers, industry and retailers.

Cows eat grass, don't they? Image by Keith Weller/USDA (www.ars.usda.gov)
Monday, August 06, 2018

Modern dairying practices the subject of Edinburgh Fringe show

Social scientist Dr Orla Shortall, of our Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences group, will discuss public attitudes towards dairy farming in her show 'Cows eat grass, don't they' as part of the Edinburgh Fringe festival.

Crop mixtures experiment (c) Debra Zuppinger-Dingley
Monday, July 30, 2018

Crop mixtures and evolution can improve agricultural productivity

Farmers and land managers can improve agricultural productivity by using crop mixtures and taking into consideration the role of evolution in shaping the plants they grow, new research by James Hutton Institute scientists and partners has found.

Phytophthora infestans in potato leaves (c) James Hutton Institute
Monday, July 30, 2018

Birch lab discover new knowledge in fight against potato blight disease

New research from the Birch lab in the University of Dundee's Division of Plant Sciences, based at the James Hutton Institute, has discovered a mechanism that could combat late blight disease in potato crops.

Grassland in a heatwave © Copyright Stefan Czapski, licensed for reuse under CCL
Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Stress-resistant crops may be way forward in the face of extreme temperatures

Scientists of the James Hutton Institute have alerted about the potential impact of extreme weather events - such as the current heatwave - on crop production and have suggested the development of stress-resistant crops as an important resource to preserve food security in the face of increased temperatures.

Potatoes will be at the centre of discussions at PiP2018 (c) James Hutton Inst
Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Potatoes in Practice looks to the future of tatties

The next generation of the potato industry will debate the future of the humble spud at this year’s Potatoes in Practice, the UK's largest field-based potato event, on the 9th August at our Balruddery Farm near Dundee.

iBMW2018 meeting in Dundee (c) James Hutton Institute
Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Barley in the spotlight at iBMW2018 meeting

The use of barley genetic mutant resources to shed light into fundamental aspects of cereal biology was at the centre of discussions at the iBMW2018 meeting, held in Dundee with the attendance of 94 crop scientists from the UK, Europe and beyond.

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Printed from /news on 16/08/18 06:32:42 PM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.