Skip to navigation Skip to content

Hutton to discuss soil research, climate change and food security at World Congress of Soil Science

soils
soils
“With around 95% of our food coming from the soil, we need to have healthy soils to provide food security not just for ourselves but for future generations. The congress and post-congress tour provide fantastic opportunities for soil scientists from around the world to share ideas on how to tackle this and other major issues that affect everyone including the role of soil in helping to mitigate against climate change”

The James Hutton Institute, world leaders in soil science, will be showcasing a number of soil research initiatives at the 22nd World Congress of Soil Science (WCSS) which is taking place in Glasgow from 31 July - 5 August, this year the theme is, ‘Soil science – crossing boundaries, changing society’.

When so many of the world’s resources are under serious threat, research into soil and the role it plays in mitigating climate change and providing food security has never been more important. One area of research which the Institute is involved in, is its work at Glensaugh, an example of a climate positive farm. Glensaugh is looking to tackle the climate and biodiversity crises with transformative farming and technological innovations.

A four-day post-congress tour around the north of Scotland organised with NatureScot for delegates, will include a visit to the Institute’s Glensaugh Farm, to learn how changes in land use and farming practice can move agriculture to net zero emissions and beyond. 

Dr Allan Lilly, a Senior Soil Scientist at the James Hutton Institute and chair of the World Congress of Soil Science tours committee added: “With around 95% of our food coming from the soil, we need to have healthy soils to provide food security not just for ourselves but for future generations. The congress and post-congress tour provide fantastic opportunities for soil scientists from around the world to share ideas on how to tackle this and other major issues that affect everyone including the role of soil in helping to mitigate against climate change.”

Other research which will be on display will include:

  • Healthy soils - Mitigating the climate emergency means protecting and enhancing soil health which will contribute to reaching net zero GHGs policy targets.
  • Plant and soil interactions - Tackling the knowledge gaps in the critical zone between roots and soil with the wider impacts to soil and food security.
  • Arable soils - Looking at how do we increase pressures on farmers to improve the local environment, reduce pollution and mitigate climate change through reduction in greenhouse emissions while maintaining increasing yields.
  • Land-use - Around 70% of Scotland’s land area is under some form of agricultural management and woodland covers 18%. Scotland’s soils hold more than 3,000 megatonnes of carbon, around 60% of which is held in deep peat soils.
  • Forensics and pollutants - Soil forensic science links environmental science (including soils, geology, ecology, botany and eDNA) with the law and delivers intelligence and evidence to the criminal justice system.

Notes for Editors

The Institute will present its work on a stand alongside SRUC and ClimateXChange through funding provided by the SEFARI Gateway.

More information on the WCSS and the associated tours can be found here. Further online resources are available here.

Press and media enquiries: 

 Adam Walker, Communications Officer, James Hutton Institute, Email Adam.Walker@hutton.ac.uk, Tel: +44 (0)1224 395095 (direct line), +44 (0)344 928 5428 (switchboard).


Printed from /news/hutton-discuss-soil-research-climate-change-and-food-security-world-congress-soil-science on 30/11/22 06:13:13 AM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.