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Scenario Planning for Environmental Management

This video created by the James Hutton Institute helps to explain Scenario Planning for Environmental Management. It has been produced as part of the EU funded project COMET-LA (COmmunity-based Management of EnvironmenTal challenges in Latin America), a project that studied approaches to support sustainable community-based management of natural resources in a context of climate change and increasing competition for resource use.

A key to supporting planning today is to understand how pressures such as climate change can affect future natural systems and societies. Considering the connections between environmental, economic and social issues is fundamental for prosperity and sustainability, with consequent implications for any debates about future land use and environmental management. Scenario planning can assist with this. A scenario is a coherent, internally consistent, and plausible description of a possible future state (including both social and natural aspects). It is not a forecast; rather, each scenario is one alternative image of how the future can unfold. The process should encourage consideration of the interactions between pressures or drivers from across levels.

Scenario-planning can take a variety of forms, and is certainly not a ‘panacea’ for all problems, but we believe that it has potential to help tackle many environmental challenges. The process of developing scenarios is thought to be useful for aiding partnerships to make explicit, share and reconcile different knowledges, expectations and aspirations. The James Hutton Institute is carrying out research on other applications and challenges associated with scenario planning for environmental management; visit the project page for more information about the Institute’s role in COMET-LA, and staff involved.


Printed from /news/multimedia/scenario-planning-environmental-management on 12/12/18 04:49:32 PM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.