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Research farm opens its gates for Climate Week

Glensaugh research farm
Glensaugh research farm
"As part of this year’s Climate Week North East, visitors to The James Hutton Institute’s Glensaugh research farm, southeast of Cairn o’Mount, will be able to take free, one to two hour, 3 km-long guided walks around the farm over two days"

A northeast farm that’s working to show how agriculture can be both climate positive and nature friendly is opening its gates – and new EV charging points – to the public at the end of the month.

As part of this year’s Climate Week North East, visitors to The James Hutton Institute’s Glensaugh research farm, southeast of Cairn o’Mount, will be able to take free, one to two hour, 3 km-long guided walks around the farm over two days.

On the tour, visitors will learn about the farm’s £6 million green hydrogen project HydroGlen. They’ll also hear about peatland restoration, adding herbs into grasslands, integrating trees and wildlife on the farm, natural flood management, managing farmland to encourage beneficial insects and much more.

Visitors could also be among the first to try out the farm’s two new electric vehicle charging points, powered by the farm’s solar panels and wind turbine.

Places are limited, so visitors are encouraged to book on one of the four Climate Positive Farming – Taster Day walks over March 30-31 in advance via Eventbrite.

The walks, which include some steep trails, start at 10.30am and 2pm on both days and will last one to two hours. Visitors are encouraged to bring waterproofs, warm clothing and sturdy footwear.

Climate Week North East, running from March 24 to April 2, is organised by North East Scotland Climate Action Network (NESCAN).

Press and media enquiries: 

Elaine Maslin, Media Officer, The James Hutton Institute, elaine.maslin@hutton.ac.uk, tel: +44 (0)1224 395076 or +44 (0)7977 805808


Printed from /news/research-farm-opens-its-gates-climate-week on 17/04/24 04:07:33 AM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.