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Shetland’s peat bogs – how important are they?

Peat bog (c) James Hutton Institute
"Restoration of peat bogs may preserve some of the benefits they provide while having negative impacts on other uses. So, how important are they to you?"

Peat bogs are useful to society in many ways – they regulate our water flows and sequester greenhouse gases while serving as a historical archive of our past and protecting unique plant and animal species. However, many peat bogs have been drained or converted to other land uses to provide other rewards such as food and timber.

Restoration of peat bogs may preserve some of the benefits they provide while having negative impacts on other uses. So, how important are they to you? Scientists from the James Hutton Institute and Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) will be conducting a workshop in Lerwick on Saturday 25th November to hear from Shetlanders about their uses of peat bogs and their restoration.

Specifically, researchers are looking for:

  • Views and experiences of land managers who own peat bogs
  • Views, motivations  and  experiences  of  people involved in peat bog restoration (including NGOs, community organisations, volunteers and land managers) as well as people living close to peat bogs
  • Whether there are conflicts or synergies between different management goals
  • How peat bogs should be managed and used

Researchers are particularly keen to speak to Shetlanders living in areas where peat bog restoration is taking place (regardless of whether or not they are involved in the process), as well as organisations and individuals involved in peat bog restoration projects.

To register and for details of the venue and time please contact Carol Kyle (01224 395206). Lunch will be provided.

More information from: 

Bernardo Rodriguez-Salcedo, Media Manager, Tel: +44 (0)1224 395089 (direct line), +44 (0)344 928 5428 (switchboard) or +44 (0)7791 193918 (mobile).


Printed from /news/shetland%E2%80%99s-peat-bogs-%E2%80%93-how-important-are-they on 24/04/19 06:56:05 AM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.