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UK and Peruvian crop scientists discuss potential of omic-based technologies

Andean potatoes are an example of Peru's rich crop biodiversity
“Many possibilities for collaboration were identified, both for establishing research collaborations and for enhancing capacity building in Peru. These activities should provide enhanced prospects for improving food security in the country and beyond”

A recent workshop co-organised by the Earlham Institute and the Catholic University of Santa María gathered plant scientists from Peru and the UK to discuss the application of 'omic' technologies for the research of crop biodiversity in Peru and the UK.

The high genetic diversity of crops in Peru has great potential for the development of the country. However, a significant number of current research projects within this field lack a comprehensive approach, which leads to a fragmented knowledge of the country's crop biodiversity and a limited impact on local agriculture.

This event focussed on the application of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and computational chemistry for the proper characterisation and valorisation of the genetic biodiversity of Peruvian crops with a more holistic and comprehensive approach.

Dr Glenn Bryan, potato geneticist at the James Hutton Institute’s Cell and Molecular Sciences group, attended the event and commented: “Many possibilities for collaboration were identified, both for establishing research collaborations and for enhancing capacity building in Peru and the UK.”

During the meeting, further avenues for cooperation between UK plant research centres and Peruvian agricultural institutes were explored, particularly for early-career researchers. It is hoped that subsequent collaboration may result in projects with significant downstream benefits to Peruvian and UK crop researchers.

The event was funded by the Newton-Paulet programme, a collaboration between the British Council and Peru's National Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (CONCYTEC). 

More information from: 

Bernardo Rodriguez-Salcedo, Media Manager, Tel: +44 (0)1224 395089 (direct line), +44 (0)344 928 5428 (switchboard) or +44 (0)7791 193918 (mobile).


Printed from /news/uk-and-peruvian-crop-scientists-discuss-potential-omic-based-technologies on 09/12/19 02:30:06 AM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.