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A very successful Royal Highland Show 2019 for Hutton science

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon visited the Hutton marquee at the Highland Show
"The ten individual displays and accompanying activities covered an even wider span of Institute work than has been portrayed previously, which is great for demonstrating the breadth of our relevance. Sustainability and climate challenges featured prominently across the board"

It was another brilliant Royal Highland Show (20-23 June 2019) for the James Hutton Institute, with a steady stream of visitors of all ages to the Hutton marquee including farmers, families, schoolchildren and research partners, as well as a significant number of UK and Scottish politicians and elected representatives.

The Institute’s cutting edge research was on display through exhibits covering integrated pest management; the future of agriculture including the International Barley Hub and the Advanced Plant Growth Centre initiative; soil research including peatlands in virtual reality; honeyberries; forestry and social science, along with stands from James Hutton Limited, Intelligent Growth Solutions and SEFARI. The Institute’s presence at the RHET Centre offered young visitors hands-on experiences and a chance to reflect upon what our food plate will look like in 2050.

On Show Thursday, the Institute hosted the James Hutton Reception, in which our phenomenal Tay Cities Deal success was celebrated and Secretary of State for Scotland David Mundell MP marked the occasion with a keynote address. 

Show Friday’s Superfoods Breakfast saw Lord Duncan, Under Secretary of State for Scotland, speak to attendees about the importance of the work carried out by the James Hutton Institute, and the value of research and innovation for British agricultural industries. We were then visited by First Minister Nicola Sturgeon MSP, and later by Ruth Davidson MSP, as well as by numerous other elected representatives over the course of the Show.

Later that morning, the press were out in force to cover the Best Soil in Show and NEWBIE prizegiving ceremonies, where the Best Soil in Show title went to Richard Gospel, of Hassiewells Farm near Rothienorman, and the Young Farmers trophy to Alistair Brunton, of Balmonth Farm in Fife, who scooped it for a second time. NEWBIE award winners Lynbreck Croft collected their prize and were filmed by a crew from Spanish TV channel La Sexta for a programme focussing on Scotland's experiences with regard to rural depopulation issues. Numerous visitors were in attendance for both ceremonies.

All in all, the four days of the Show evidenced a real buzz about the range of content and interest in Hutton displays which seemed to appeal to kids, adults, experts and newcomers alike, with an impressive array of tech, more traditional science and interpretative activities available. The Institute also reached hundreds of thousands via social media during the event.

Professor Colin Campbell commented: “Thanks to all colleagues who contributed to yet another successful public engagement, industry engagement and government relations effort at the Royal Highland Show this past week.

The ten individual displays and accompanying activities covered an even wider span of Institute work than has been portrayed previously, which is great for demonstrating the breadth of our relevance. Sustainability and climate challenges featured prominently across the board. Colleagues from Rowett and other SEFARI institutes complimented the quality of Hutton’s activities and displays, and commented on how favourably they compared to other science exhibits."

More information from: 

Bernardo Rodriguez-Salcedo, Media Manager, Tel: +44 (0)1224 395089 (direct line), +44 (0)344 928 5428 (switchboard) or +44 (0)7791 193918 (mobile).


Printed from /news/very-successful-royal-highland-show-2019-hutton-science on 18/07/19 12:08:46 AM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.