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Working together for better solutions to natural resource challenges

Landscape at Glensaugh (c) James Hutton Institute
"We need to learn how we can continually improve how we work together for better outcomes to address the complex natural resource challenges that affect us all in the 21st century.

Organisations from all across the UK are coming together to discuss ways of working together to achieve better outcomes when it comes to land and natural resource challenges, through a workshop organised by the James Hutton Institute with support from the Macaulay Development Trust and other partners.

By looking at common problems from different perspectives, it is hoped that participants will be able to advance their knowledge and ability to work together for improved delivery of solutions. The event is aimed at funders of research, leading international researchers and wider users of research outputs.

This workshop builds on the recent James Hutton Institute ‘Developing an Interdisciplinary Culture of Excellence’ (DICE) project that aimed to improve our understanding of current levels of interdisciplinary research within the James Hutton Institute and assess what was required to support an interdisciplinary culture of excellence.

Dr Kit Macleod, catchment scientist at the James Hutton Institute and workshop co-ordinator, said: “As a community of researchers, funders of research and wider users of the research produced, we need to learn how we can continually improve how we work together for better outcomes to address the complex natural resource challenges that affect us all in the 21st century.”

On behalf of the Macaulay Development Trust, chair Eric Baird commented: “Policy - and the lack of it - determines much of our practice in land management. It’s crucial that policy is evidence-based, and that the evidence is credible and convincing. Science is the best way to get the best evidence. Science is therefore the key link between policy and practice. The Macaulay Development Trust supports excellent science in the field of natural resource management, and that is why we are supporting the workshop.”

The workshop aims to:

  • Produce three short guides on ‘How do we best support and evaluate working together for better outcomes’ for funders of research, researchers and wider users of research outputs;
  • Facilitate the sharing of perspectives from across funders of research, leading international researchers, and wider users of research outputs on how to support and evaluate working together for better outcomes;
  • Share and reflect on what we have learned during the James Hutton Institute’s ‘Developing an Interdisciplinary Culture of Excellence’ (DICE) project; and
  • Produce a multi-author peer reviewed publication that communicates to an academic audience the process and key findings from the workshop.

Notes to editors:

The workshop will take place on 26-27th March 2015, at the Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation, Edinburgh, EH1 1LZ, UK.

Participants in the workshop include representatives from Birmingham City University, Stockholm Environment Institute, University of York, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, University of Edinburgh, James Hutton Institute, University of Abertay, Scotland’s Rural College, University of Aberdeen, Macaulay Development Trust, Australian National University, Scottish Government, Natural Environment Research Council, Scottish Natural Heritage, University of Dundee, University of Leeds, Scottish Water, Cranfield University, Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Agrii and Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.

More information from: 

Bernardo Rodriguez-Salcedo, Media Manager, Tel: +44 (0)1224 395089 (direct line), +44 (0)344 928 5428 (switchboard) or +44 (0)7791 193918 (mobile).


Printed from /news/working-together-better-solutions-natural-resource-challenges on 22/05/19 06:21:28 AM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.