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David Donnelly

Staff picture: David Donnelly
Information and Computational Sciences
Information and Computational Sciences
GIS Consultant
david.donnelly@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

David graduated in 1987 with a BSc in Topographic Science from Glasgow University and in 2009 completed an MSc in Geographic Information Science at Birkbeck College, University of London.

Current research interests

His background is in the analysis, creation and management of geographical data and he has worked on the mapping programmes of many countries. He has extensive experience in the use and customisation of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and in photogrammetry and remote sensing.

David is experienced in creating custom GIS and other software tools for a wide range of geospatial applications and has also produced web tools to link databases and spatial data. He wrote the code for both the Apple and Android versions of the SIFSS and Soil Erosion Scotland apps (front end and back end) and the front end of SOCiT and the PotatoSize(TM) app. Some of his recent work includes websites with spatial data such as the Organic Matter tool produced with funding from CXC and Working for Waders, produced with funding from Working for Waders Initiative partners.

David is leading a task to develop a spatial register of Scotland's natural assets as part of the Scottish Government funded strategic research programme. When complete the asset register will be made accessible through a website and other tools.

David's other responsibilities at the Institute include data leasing and publications.

Past research

David wrote the GIS software to implement the Phosphorus Land Use and Slope (PLUS+) model and was the Hutton's representative on the Scotland's Environment Web management team.

Bibliography

  • Artz, R.R.E.; Donnelly, D.; Cuthbert, A.; Evans, C.; Smart, S.; Reed, M.; Kenter, J.; Clark, J. (2013) Restoration of lowland raised bogs in Scotland: emissions savings and the implications of a changing climate on lowland raised bog condition., Final report. Commissioned by the Scottish Wildlife Trust.
  • Cooksley, S.L.; Brewer, M.J.; Donnelly, D.; Spezia, L.; Tree, A. (2012) Impacts of artificial structures on the freshwater pearl mussel Margaritifera margaritifera in the River Dee, Scotland., Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 22, 318-330.
  • Towers, W.; Donnelly, D.; Condliffe, I. (2011) The role of soils information in Scottish rural policy and support., Proceedings of "Soil Science in a Changing World: First Wageningen Conference on Applied Soil Science", Wageningen, The Netherlands, 18-22 September 2011.
  • Towers, W.; Donnelly, D. (2011) Mapping vulnerable areas in Scotland., Scottish Government.
  • Towers, W.; Donnelly D.; Condliffe I.; Higgins A.; Rugg, I. (2010) Testing of biophysical criteria for areas with natural handicap in the United Kingdom., Report to the European Commission.

  • Gimona, A.; Baggio Compagnucci, A.; Donnelly, D.; Irvine, R.J. (2016) Aberdeenshire Regional Land Use Pilot: A web-based spatial tool to support land use decision making., In: Brooker, R., Hester, A. & Pakeman, R. (eds.). Ecosystem Services. The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, pp16-17.
  • Aitkenhead, M.J.; Donnelly, D.; Coull, M.C.; Gwatkin, R. (2016) Estimating soil properties with a mobile phone., In: Hartemink, A. & Minasny, B. (eds.). Digital Soil Morphometrics (Progress in Soil Science). Springer, Chapter 7, pp89-110.
  • Dawson, L.A.; Towers, W.; Owen, J.; White, D.; Coull, M.C.; Ross, J.M.; Donnelly, D.; Cooper, P. (2010) Soils of the crofts., In: Dawson, L.A., Morrice, J. & Rodway, P. Soils of the Crofts. The James Hutton Institute Publication with Crofting Connections, Aberdeen, 130pp.


Printed from /staff/david-donnelly on 16/09/21 05:41:40 PM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.