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Dominic Williams

James Hutton Institute
Cell and Molecular Sciences
Crop Image Analyst
dominic.williams@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)
 

Dominic Williams joined James Hutton Limited in 2015 as part of a project developing a field based hyperspectral imaging platform for use in soft fruit industry.  They have been responsible for the development of imaging techniques, image analysis methods and interpretation of the data from such a platform.  The main focus of their research has been using hyperspectral imaging to help detect and understand below ground stress in raspberry and blueberry crops.  Work has also been carried out investigating sources of yield instability in cherry and blueberry crops.  This has involved both the use of hyperspectral imaging to monitor vegatative growth and also the use of timelapse cameras and novel image analysis techniques to detect plant polinator interactions.

Dominic has been primarily involved in research on Scottish fruit crops but has carried out research on all the major crop groups that the Institute carried out research on.

In 2021 Dominic moved from James Hutton Limited to the James Hutton Institute.  He is involved in ongoing research projects developing phenotyping tools and understanding the link between hyperspectral imaging responses and underlying plant gentics.

 

 

Bibliography

  • Karley, A.J.; Graham, J.; Mitchell, C.; Williams, C.; Mitchell, D.; Jennings, N.; Dolan, A.; McFarlane, S.; Prashar, A.; Begg, G.; Birch, A.N.E. (2018) IPM tools for pest and disease management in raspberry plantations., Crop Protection in Northern Britain 2018: The Dundee Conference, Environmental Management and Crop Production, Apex City Quay Hotel, Dundee, 27-28 February 2018. Conference Proceedings, pp55-58.

Printed from /staff/dominic-williams on 17/04/24 04:02:24 AM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.