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Miriam Glendell

Staff picture: Miriam Glendell
Environmental and Biochemical Sciences
Environmental and Biochemical Sciences
Catchment Modeller
miriam.glendell@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

I am a catchment scientist interested in a cross-disciplinary understanding of the effects of land use on multiple ecosystem services, including water quality, freshwater biodiversity, soil conservation and carbon management in catchment systems.  My research combines aspects of freshwater biology, hydrology, soil science and biogeochemistry to address key challenges related to the sustainable management of soils and surface water.

Current research interests

Applying and developing catchment and national scale water quality models for nitrogen, phosphorus and faecal indicator organisms.

Developing sediment tracing tools using biomarkers and stable isotopes.

Linking physico-chemical indicators of water quality to ecological status.

Past research

  • ‘Linking the terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes at a catchment scale’ – a proof of concept project to develop a methodological framework for quantifying of lateral C fluxes from the terrestrial to the aquatic environments at a catchment scale.
  • ‘Piloting  a cost-effective framework for monitoring soil erosion in England and Wales’ – national pilot study funded by the UK Department of Food, Farming and Rural Affairs
  • ‘Evaluating an ecosystem management approach for improving water quality on the Holnicote Estate, Exmoor’ – a national demonstration project to evaluate the effectiveness of natural flood management measures to deliver multiple ecosystem benefits, including flood protection, water quality and carbon stewardship.

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The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.