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Annie McKee

Staff picture: Annie McKee
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences
Social Researcher in Land Management
annie.mckee@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Annie McKee is a social researcher in land management in the Social Economic and Geographical Sciences Group (SEGS). Annie's background is in geography, environmental management and sustainable development, with previous dissertation research exploring public perceptions of red deer management and sustainable rural communities. Annie has a BSc (Hons.) in Geography from the University of St Andrews, and completed an MSc in Sustainable Rural Development at the University of Aberdeen in 2007.

Annie completed her PhD in 2013 with the Centre for Mountain Studies, Perth College, University of the Highlands and Islands, working as part of the 'Sustainable Estates for the 21st Century' project. Under the supervision of Professor Martin Price (Director, Centre for Mountain Studies) and Dr Charles Warren (University of St Andrews), her PhD aimed to examine the role of private landownership in facilitating sustainable rural communities in upland Scotland, focusing on identifying best practice in community engagement and the practical steps required to ensure sustainability. For further information please see Sustainable Estates for the 21st Century website for further information.

Annie is also Secretary of the Andrew Raven Trust, Scottish Charity Number: SCO39488, Vice Convenor of Rural Housing Scotland, Scottish Charity Number: SC031239, and a Trustee of Tarland Development Group.

Current research interests

Annie's research interests include stakeholder and community engagement practices, rural governance and institutions, land management and land use policy, sustainable game management, the impact of land reform, rural community development and achieving sustainable development in rural areas. Annie has developed extensive knowledge and understanding of landownership and estate management systems through her PhD research (Thesis title: ‘The role of private landownership in contributing to sustainable rural communities in upland Scotland’), contributing to the ‘Sustainable Estates for the 21st Century’ project.

Annie also has significant experience of qualitative data collection and analysis, utilising methods such as ethnography, participant observation, semi-structured and autobiographical interviewing, and adopting action research and transdisciplinary approaches. She has developed proficient workshop facilitation skills through research roles in the HUNTing for Sustainability and FarmPath FP7 projects, amongst others, including contributing to the Scottish Government’s Strategic Research Programme (2011 – 2016 and 2016 – 2021 (ongoing)), under the themes of ‘rural economy adaptation to key external drivers’ (Work Package 2.4.2) and 'local assets, local decisions and community resilience' (Work Package 3.4.4).

On-going and recent projects

  • Project team contributing to the Scottish Government's 'Women in Farming and the Agricultural Sector' project (report due to be published in June 2017).
  • Project team contributing to the Centre of Expertise for Waters (CREW) project on community resilience to flood events.
  • Leading a Macaulay Development Trust project to facilitate a discussion on Scottish land reform.
  • Fellowship received from the OECD Co-operative Research Programme: Biological Resource Management for Sustainable Agricultural Systems in 2016, building links with the Centre for Rural Research, Trondheim, Norway.
  • Project team contributing to the Scottish Government’s Strategic Research Programme (2016 – 2021 ), under the themes of ‘rural economy adaptation to key external drivers’ (Work Package 2.4.2) and 'local assets, local decisions and community resilience' (Work Package 3.4.4); both projects funded under the Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services (RESAS) Division set up by the Scottish Government.

Past research

  • FarmPath, REFRESH, PROAKIS, and 'HUNTing for Sustainability' projects, funded under the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7).
  • Scottish Government-funded projects exploring the barriers to community land-based activities and how to overcome these barriers, as well as contributing to an exploration of the 'impact of diversity of ownership scale on social, economic and environmental outcomes'.
  • Theme 8, Work Package 8.2 "Governance and decision-making for community empowerment in rural communities" and Theme 3, Work Package 3.6 “Understanding land managers’ attitudes and behaviour towards the management of environmental assets and responding to climate change ", both projects funded under the Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services (RESAS) Division set up by the Scottish Government (Strategic Research Programme 2011-2016).
  • Undertaking social research within the Scottish Government’s Centre of Expertise for Livestock Disease Outbreaks (EPIC), in particular focussing on the impact of farmer behaviour on disease control and biosecurity.
  • Developing Learning Landscapes for Scotland’s Protected Areas - A European Perspective (funded by the Macaulay Development Trust).
  • How can we employ citizen science to determine the extent of soil erosion in Scotland? Report commissioned by SNIFFER (2014).
  • A methodology for assessing the public interest economic impacts of deer management. Report commissioned by SNH (2013).
  • ‘Sustainable Estates for the 21st Century’: The role of private landownership in facilitating sustainable rural communities in upland Scotland, funded by The Henry Angest Foundation (PhD awarded November 2013).
  • Sustainable Estates for the 21st Century: Knowledge Exchange Project, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, Scottish Government and Scottish Land & Estates (2011)

Bibliography

  • Pinto-Correia, T.; McKee, A.; Guimaraes, H. (2015) Transdisciplinarity in deriving sustainability pathways for agriculture., In: Sutherland, L-A., Darnhofer, I., Wilson G. A. & Zagata, L. (eds.). Transition Pathways towards Sustainability in Agriculture: Case Studies from Europe. CABI, Wallingford, Chapter 12, pp171-188.
  • McKee, A. (2013) The laird and the community., In: Glass, J., Price, M.F., Warren, C. & Scott, A. (eds.). Lairds, Land and Sustainability. Edinburgh University Press, Chapter 5.
  • McKee, A.; Warren, C.; Glass, J.; Wagstaff, P. (2013) Scottish private estate., In: Glass, J., Price, M.F., Warren, C. & Scott, A. (eds.). Lairds, Land and Sustainability: Scottish Perspectives on Upland Management. Edinburgh University Press, Chapter 3.
  • Glass, J.; McMorran, R.; Price, M.; McKee, A. (2012) Working together for sustainable estate communities: exploring the potential of collaborative initiatives between private estates, communities and other partners., Centre for Mountain Studies, Perth College, University of Highlands and Islands.


Printed from /staff/annie-mckee on 20/06/19 12:15:24 AM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.