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Imaging Technologies

E.coli bacteria growing in a root seen using confocal and EM imaging
Imaging technologies is well resourced to provide a wide range of imaging methods.

The Imaging Technologies (ImTech) Group based at the Dundee site, within the Cell and Molecular Sciences group, is involved in a wide variety of research across the James Hutton Institute.

The unit has a wide variety of resources, and staff knowledge covers a broad range of standard and cutting-edge techniques that are utilised in many projects including both Scottish Government work packages and external grants. The wide experience of ImTech staff is also regularly called upon to train other institute staff, students and visiting workers as part of collaborative projects.

The main staff are:

  • Alison Roberts (senior postdoctoral researcher)
    Alison is a plant cell biologist with a background in plant virology and plant physiology. Her main interests include virus movement, plasmodesmata, the sink-source transition and the systemic transport of endogenous and pathogen-related molecules through the phloem.
  • Kathryn Wright (senior postdoctoral researcher)
    A plant physiologist with a background in solute transport, phloem tracers, the hypersensitive response and plant virus movement, Kath is currently studying the localisation of human pathogenic bacteria within plant roots and of effectors secreted by potato cyst nematodes into their host.
  • Sean Chapman (senior postdoctoral researcher)
    A plant virologist and molecular biologist, Sean has extensive knowledge and experience in creating and utilising plant virus vectors for use as heterologous expression systems. He also runs the electron microscopy facility and is involved in the production of novel fluorescent reporter proteins.

For further information, please contact Alison Roberts.

Research

Areas of Interest


Printed from /research/groups/cell-and-molecular-sciences/imtech on 23/09/18 07:15:13 AM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.