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Charlie Shand

Staff picture: Charlie Shand
Environmental and Biochemical Sciences
Environmental and Biochemical Sciences
Senior Research Scientist
charlie.shand@hutton.ac.uk
+44 (0)344 928 5428 (*)

The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen AB15 8QH
Scotland UK

 

Dr Shand is a currently a senior research scientist in the Soil Group at The James Hutton Institute in Aberdeen.

Current research interests

He is involved in assessing the impact of land use change on soil functions and the assessment of the phosphorus status of Scottish soils in relation to the potential for loss of P from soils to the aquatic environment. With colleagues from the Institute and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences he is involved in developing micronutrient management strategies in organic systems and how to utilise local and site specific resources for sustainable crop and animal production.

Bibliography

  • Cheshire, M.V., Shand, C.A., Wood, K.A., Smith, S. and Coutts, G. (1998) Factors controlling the movement of radiocasium in organic soils., In: Energy and the Environment. Geochemistry of Fossil, Nuclear and Renewable Resources (ed. K. Nicholson). MacGregor Science, pp141-152.

  • Shand, C.A.; Miller, A. (2014) Report from discussion on "Closed Loop Systems"., Sustainable Agriculture and Soil Innovation (SASI), a NERC-Royal Society of Chemistry Industry Exchange Event, London, 31 March-1 April 2014.
  • Shand, C.A. (2012) Project 2. Closed loop systems for recovering nutrients from waste., In: Securing Soils for Sustainable Agriculture: a science led strategy, Royal Society of Chemistry, pp25-26.
  • Sinclair A. H.; Crooks, W.; Edwards, A.C.; Lumsdon, D.G.; Coull, M.C.; Shand, C.A. (2012) Assessing the potential risks to water quality from phosphate leaching., SEPA Contract Number R11123STA, September 2012, pp80.
  • Evans, T.; Stewart, D.; Shand, C.A.; Tibbett, M. (2012) A science-led strategy for soil security and sustainable agriculture (Project 2)., In: A Science-Led Strategy for Soil Security and Sustainable Agriculture. From "Optimising Soil Chemistry for Agriculture and Resource Efficiency (OSCAR)" - Workshop held at the Royal Society of Chemistry, London, 28-29 November 2011.
  • Paterson, E.; Campbell, C.D.; Coull, M.C.; Shand, C.A. (2011) Geochemical atlas for Scottish topsoils., The Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, Aberdeen. ISBN 978-0-902701-007
  • Shand, C.A.; Cheshire, M.V. (1999) Databases and Reports - A deliverable for the REDUP Research Project., EC Contract No. IC15-CT96-0212. On Compact Disc. Produced by G. Rauret, M.Vida, P. Pardo, A. Rigol, M. Comps and T. Sauras. University of Barcelona.
  • Shand, C.A., Rauret, G., Vidal, M., Rigol, A. and Cramps, M. (1999) The reduction of 137Cs and 90Sr uptake by grasses in natural meadows (REDUP). Final Report 1st February 1997-31st July 1999., Report to EC.
  • Shand, C.A.; Cheshire, M.V. (1999) The reduction of 137Cs and 90Sr uptake by grasses in natural meadows (REDUP)., European Commission Contract No. IC15-CT96-0212. Second Twelve Monthly Progress Report.
  • Shand, C.A.; Cheshire, M.V. (1999) Agricultural practices as restoration strategy : 1997 experiments. A deliverable for the REDUP Research Project., European Commission Contract No. IC15-CT96-0212.
  • Shand, C.A.; Cheshire, M.V. (1999) Characterisation of soils. A deliverable for the REDUP Research Project., European Commission Contract No. IC15-CT96-0212.
  • Shand, C.A. (1999) REDUP Contract No. ERBIC 15 CT960212, Progress Report 01 March 1998 to 28 February 1999., Submitted to Co-ordinator for purpose of writing Annual/Final report.
  • Shand, C.A.; Cheshire, M.V. (1998) The reduction of 137Cs and 90Sr uptake by grasses in natural meadows (REDUP). Progress report: 1 February 1997 - 31 January 1998., European Commission Contract No. IC15-CT96-0212. First Twelve Monthly Progress Report.

Printed from /staff/charlie-shand on 18/10/19 04:33:00 AM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.