Skip to navigation Skip to content

Soft fruit genetics

Photograph of Glen Fyne raspberries bred at the Institute
The results of the research within soft fruit genetics are applied within commercially-funded breeding programmes, for the production of improved cultivars for the UK fruit industry.

Soft fruit genetics research at the James Hutton Institute is focused on two key genera:

  • Rubus (raspberries, blackberries and hybrid berries such as `Tayberry’)
  • Ribes (currants and gooseberries).

Research within the fruit group is active in the following main areas.

  • Linking genotype to phenotype, through the development of genetic linkage maps and collation of robust trait data.
  • Marker development and downstream deployment strategies.
  • Physical mapping (Rubus) and gene discovery related to key traits for breeding.
  • Fruit quality, especially health-related components and sensory traits, particularly their heritability and genetic control.
  • Investigations of factors linked to environmentally sustainable production, for example, pest and disease resistance, climate adaptation in blackcurrant.
  • Utilisation of the extensive genetic resources at the Institute to develop new germplasm aligned with emerging problems and opportunities.

The results of the research within soft fruit genetics are applied within commercially-funded breeding programmes, for the production of improved cultivars for the UK fruit industry. The breeding at the James Hutton Institute is entirely based on classical hybridisation and applies modern techniques such as marker-assisted breeding across a wide range of diverse germplasm to improve efficiency and reduce the time to cultivar. Outputs are often linked to specific processes, products and markets and several Institute cultivars of blackcurrant, raspberry and blackberry are leaders in their respective sectors.

Research

Areas of Interest


Printed from /research/groups/cell-and-molecular-sciences/soft-fruit-genetics on 11/12/18 01:07:52 PM

The James Hutton Research Institute is the result of the merger in April 2011 of MLURI and SCRI. This merger formed a new powerhouse for research into food, land use, and climate change.